Wednesday PM ~ TheFrontPageCover

TheFrontPageCover
~ Featuring ~
Cheapest States Where 
You'll Want to Retire 2018
by Stacy Rapacon
AGHnzvDgAIc_dkrUO59jF21LrUmiQ79dA3RIshU-YlAdfSFPOhc54BmJs1OTRtvnrEX-cCbeiMVXdurlydL03p7YzXsWg_6cAavWTIOYU1PogQU4ftAjtXM=s0-d-e1-ft#%3Ca%20rel%3Dnofollow%20href=
.
CNN LIbtard Tries and Fails to Twist Giuliani Words into A Trap
{ rickwells.us } ~ Reflecting CNN’s obsession with forcing President Trump from office... Dana Bash asked Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani if President Trump exposing the fact that he was being spied on by the FBI and the fact that the “investigation” under which it was conducted has morphed into the still ongoing witch hunt, creates the appearance that the White House is interfering. Giuliani takes a moment to try to make sense of out what she’s babbling and then replies, “I don’t see that, Dana. I think that the White House has every right to know, I think the President has every right to know as commander-in-chief,” noting that the “investigation” has revealed nothing new and nothing incriminating over the course of over a year, therefore that is exculpatory. There is no evidence so there was no wrongdoing. Bash seizes on one aspect of Giuliani’s reply for her next distortion, twisting herself up into knots as she attempts to likewise twist reality. She says, “You say that the President has a right to know as commander-in-chief, this is a complex situation. He’s not just commander-in-chief, he was the head of and was a candidate for a campaign of which this investigation is taking place.”...
.
Behind Islamic Jihad’s barrage 
of attacks on Israel, the hand of Iran  
V_LHcTwO3uGByQ1ihylUwhnNYybD8r-viuoHLlPp2Yxxme9Kdh1xMsC4JQqlmjIFE9m9GuXq7IgC7f0Ysddsdk6i96L3B3URFd2-gXZrke6vqJHbc8qdi24CQ1VqUtgy2ZJe3w=s0-d-e1-ft#%3Ca%20rel%3Dnofollow%20href=?width=450by AVI ISSACHAROFF
{ timesofisrael.com } ~ Tuesday morning’s barrages of mortar shells and rockets into southern Israel were quickly rumored in Gaza to be the work of the Islamic Jihad terror group... And hours after more than two dozen mortar shells hit Israel, the IDF carried out retaliatory strikes that were mainly directed at Islamic Jihad’s military wing. Islamic Jihad’s role indicates we are witnessing an attempt by Iran to spark a war on the southern border. And if the deterioration of the situation is not halted in the very near future, the attempt may prove successful. Already we have seen an attack on Israeli targets unprecedented since 2014’s Protective Edge conflict, with a consequent Israeli response against targets in Gaza. The Islamic Jihad barrages were ostensibly aimed at avenging Israel’s reported killing of three of its operatives, who were attempting an attack, earlier this week in the Rafah area. That was the immediate pretext. But the nature and scale of the Islamic Jihad response — heavy fire at civilian targets in Israel — indicates that revenge was not the only motivation. It is possible that this is at root an Iranian move, seeking to have Israel pay a price in the south for targeting Iran in the north — across the border in Syria...
.
Trump Pressures Dems to 
End Law Separating Families at the Border 
VMdZe1EUkRICtaHuKjRBVCWasns07aS1z3X_MkKPwnRoOWomYCM7o256Gk2yyjnxJ8BIi03iWJjuBUcmcy3yTH9dkl2FdmlSJ0-0igi2hR7Z=s0-d-e1-ft#%3Ca%20rel%3Dnofollow%20href=?width=450by Kerry Lear 
{ punchingbagpost.com } ~ On Saturday, President Donald Trump put Democrats on blast for their lack of action to end a "horrible law"... that separates children from their families when they cross the border. "Put pressure on the Democrats to end the horrible law that separates children from their parents once they cross the Border into the U.S. Catch and Release, Lottery and Chain must also go with it and we MUST continue building the WALL! DEMOCRATS ARE PROTECTING MS-13 THUGS," tweeted Trump. The Democrats have been resistant to Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions' "zero tolerance" policy against illegal immigration. Last month, Sessions announced that the Departments of Justice and Homeland Security will be implementing the strict policy. He also said he would be sending 35 more prosecutors and 18 immigration judges to handle immigration cases at the southwest border...
.
The Threat of Erdogan
I62gMjSM0k6MyLD4JFc--22hbGK3B-6vFMmdB_2XpfehDd_TujYh5VbH4OoC2lIkED01skjQrv3wTaTQPmsrFuXXxU1H6VaHQLs5Wuz-A93BDKhCbVr1oWFvJ3P0iiIAF-DUCf4c12EfjLRdJO5R1jyQZQIKXVZG-4STTd4RT46LNp5yWLflaA=s0-d-e1-ft#%3Ca%20rel%3Dnofollow%20href=?width=450by Joseph Puder
{ frontpagemag.com } ~ Turkey’s Dictator Recep Tayyip Erdogan, assembled with great urgency Sunni-Muslim leaders from the Middle East, Asia, and Africa, as well as Iran’s Shiite President Hassan Rouhani...  The assembled representatives of the 57 member-states of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) held this “emergency meeting” in Istanbul, Turkey, by virtue of Turkey’s holding the presidency of the OIC.  The ostensible reason for the meeting was the Gaza “March of the Return,” and the U.S. embassy relocation to Jerusalem. According to Al-Jazeera, the Qatari based network also funded by the Qatari regime, Erdogan called on Muslim leaders to “unite and confront Israel.”  He mentioned “70 years of Israeli occupation,” wrongly charging that Israel, before 1967, “occupied” Palestinian lands. Apparently, in the dictator’s mind, the UN never voted for partition of Palestine in 1947. Erdogan, obfuscating the fact that the Arab community in Palestine rejected the UN partition plan, while the Jewish community in Palestine accepted it, fulminated against the Jewish state, distortimg history in his blind hatred. He conveniently disregarded the fact that the Arab armies of Egypt, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, and contingents from the Islamic world along with the Arabs of Palestine attacked and sought to annihilate the newborn Jewish state. Actually it was the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan that occupied the lands allotted to the Arab-Palestinians by the UN, which they the Palestinians rejected in November, 1947. Erdogan shamelessly compared Israeli treatment of Palestinians to the Nazi treatment of Jews during the Holocaust...
.
No Way José
DUTzDU6MCzuLpIz-bAAUR4ziU53oDAgy6O-nmmvfAr08Wv8k8LmJc0CjbIf-3XeQRuKCAJGSrnQGFy3PdgjtGeWoOZbiNSMrvrRIyc3ncg24R9lup2KPrvzm-iQOco2GyHnyRHv-4LcZ2jZJXRkkiPwYj3DTx2o1GnENvjCXlbaHxfqiFLZjHPWY=s0-d-e1-ft#%3Ca%20rel%3Dnofollow%20href=?width=450by Lloyd Billingsley
{ frontpagemag.com } ~ With at least 11 million false-documented illegals in the United States – the real number is doubtless twice that... it’s clear that Mexican nationals feel entitled to defy U.S. immigration law. At the same time, the Pueblo Sin Fronterascrowd, denounces the United States as exploitive and slams the American founders as a pack of white supremacists. That calls for a look at José Vasconcelos (1882-1959), a major figure in Mexican history and influential to this day. Vasconcelos served as rector of the National University of Mexico, and president Alvaro Obregon appointed him as minister of public education from 1921-24. The next year he authored The Cosmic Race, an essay contending that “the mixed race that inhabits the Ibero-American continent,” is destined to become “the first synthetic race of the earth,” surpassing the “four racial trunks: the Black, the Indian, the Mongol, and the White.” “The basis of white civilization is fuel,” explains the erudite Vasconcelos, who ran for president of Mexico in 1929. “It served as a protection against the long winters. Then, it was discovered that its power could be used not only for warmth, but also for work; and the motor was born.” On the other hand, “the mestizo, the Indian, and even the Black are superior to the White in a countless number of properly spiritual capacities.”...   https://www.frontpagemag.com/fpm/270294/no-way-jos%C3%A9-lloyd-billingsley 
.
AGHnzvDgAIc_dkrUO59jF21LrUmiQ79dA3RIshU-YlAdfSFPOhc54BmJs1OTRtvnrEX-cCbeiMVXdurlydL03p7YzXsWg_6cAavWTIOYU1PogQU4ftAjtXM=s0-d-e1-ft#%3Ca%20rel%3Dnofollow%20href=
.
Cheapest States Where 
You'll Want to Retire 2018
Po41GCAio7CV9fP3vablgEN7dfQdZeT7hG2RfKfeinWENT9HE_JD8A0G0qdIQY9zSKvWWLo3YBGv_EAU6eQdgnRuKTrt0JVUGlybRYUFVtGzy4zpjtz8N2SRjVNK8AbD=s0-d-e1-ft#%3Ca%20rel%3Dnofollow%20href=?width=450
by Stacy Rapacon
{ jewishworldreview.com } ~ Affordability is a key factor in deciding your ultimate retirement destination. After all, you need to make sure your living costs don't put too big a strain on your fixed income. Indeed, 67% of people say they'd move to a less expensive location to have a more financially comfortable retirement, according to a survey by Merrill Lynch and Age Wave, a research firm focused on the aging population. To that end, we identified which states are the cheapest in the nation, offering below-average living costs.

Of course, being cheap is sometimes just as bad as it sounds, and affordable living costs don't always guarantee a friendly financial environment. We ranked all 50 states for retirement based on several financial data points, including cost of living, as well as the tax treatment of resident retirees and the fiscal health of the state. These 10 states are among the best and most affordable for retirees.

Pennsylvania

Overall retirement ranking: #14

Population: 12.8 million

Share of population 65+: 16.7%

Cost of living: 3% below U.S. average

Average income for 65+ households: $48,706

Average health care costs for a retired couple: Below average at $411,414

Tax rating for retirees: Most Tax Friendly

The Keystone State locks in an affordable standard of living for retirees. Health care costs for a 65-year-old retired couple come in 2.9% below the national average. And the tax situation, among the 10 friendliest in the U.S. for retirees, can boost your bottom line even more: Most retirement income, including Social Security benefits, is not taxed. Unfortunately, Pennsylvania's own budget is not so sturdy. With not enough cash to cover short- or long-term obligations, its fiscal health ranks a low 45th among all 50 states, according to rankings from the Mercatus Center at the George Mason University.

South Dakota

Overall retirement ranking: #1

Population: 851,058

Share of population 65+: 15.2%

Cost of living: 4% below the U.S. average

Average income for 65+ households: $43,712

Average health care costs for a retired couple: Below average at $415,297

Tax rating for retirees: Most Tax Friendly

The Mount Rushmore State might not be the first place that comes to mind when you dream of where to retire, but it's first place in our overall ranking of all 50 states for retirement. Affordability is the main factor pushing it to the top spot. In addition to low living expenses, including for health care, South Dakota is one the 10 Best States for Taxes on Retirees. And you can be confident it'll stay that way. The state ranks third in the country for fiscal soundness, according to a recent report from George Mason University's Mercatus Center, which indicates high confidence that it can keep up with short-term expenses and long-term financial obligations.

Idaho

Overall retirement ranking: #11

Population: 1.6 million

Share of population 65+: 14.3%

Cost of living: 5% below the U.S. average

Average income for 65+ households: $40,248

Average health care costs for a retired couple: Below average at $407,942

Tax rating for retirees: Mixed

Put your potato jokes away, people. Idaho has some serious advantages to offer your retirement. The state's affordability, for one thing, makes it easy to stretch your retirement savings. And while the tax picture for retirees is mixed--there's a statewide sales tax of 6% and a state income tax that can go as high as 7.4%--Social Security benefits are not subject to state taxes. Idaho also is one of the states that doesn't have an inheritance or estate tax.

South Carolina

Overall retirement ranking: #12

Population: 4.8 million

Share of population 65+: 15.8%

Cost of living: 7% below the U.S. average

Average income for 65+ households: $43,340

Average health care costs for a retired couple: Below average at $408,343

Tax rating for retirees: Tax Friendly

If the mild weather and southern charm of the Palmetto State aren't enough of a retirement draw, surely the affordability can tempt you. On top of below-average living costs, the tax situation goes easy on a fixed income, too. South Carolina doesn't tax Social Security benefits and offers generous exemptions on other types of retirement income. It also does not levy an inheritance or estate tax. Property taxes tend to be very low.

Georgia

Overall retirement ranking: #3

Population: 10.1 million

Share of population 65+: 12.3%

Cost of living: 7% below the U.S. average

Average income for 65+ households: $50,607

Average health care costs for a retired couple: Below average at $404,460

Tax rating for retirees: Most Tax Friendly

Warm weather and low living costs make Georgia just peachy for a happy retirement destination. Health care expenses are particularly affordable for retirees, with the sixth lowest average costs for a retired couple in the country. Plus, Georgia's favorable tax situation makes it one of the 10 Best States for Taxes on Retirees.

Missouri

Overall retirement ranking: #20

Population: 6.1 million

Share of population 65+: 15.4%

Cost of living: 10% below U.S. average

Average income for 65+ households: $43,540

Average health care costs for a retired couple: Below average at $408,746

Tax rating for retirees: Mixed

The Show Me State has little to tell in the way of retirement advantages other than a cheap cost of living--and even that comes with a caveat. The low living expenses go hand in hand with relatively low household incomes. And the tax situation is moderate: If your adjusted gross income is less than $85,000 for single filers ($100,000 for couples filing jointly), your Social Security benefits are not taxed and you can deduct a portion of your public retirement benefits. But distributions from individual retirement accounts, 401(k)s and other employer retirement plans are taxable at ordinary income tax levels, which hits the top rate of 6% on more than just $9,000 of taxable income.

And one notable downside: Missouri ranks low at 42nd in the nation for senior health with a high percentage of low-care nursing home residents and a high prevalence of smoking, according to the United Health Foundation.

Ohio

Overall retirement ranking: #19

Population: 11.6 million

Share of population 65+: 15.5%

Cost of living: 12% below U.S. average

Average income for 65+ households: $42,667

Average health care costs for a retired couple: Below average at $417,912

Tax rating for retirees: Mixed

Ohio's status as a destination for retirees matches its geographic location: in the middle. Its living costs are well below average, but so is its average household income. Even the tax situation is just fine: Social Security benefits are not taxed, and retirees living in the Buckeye State can claim a tax credit of up to $200 on other retirement income.

Iowa

Overall retirement ranking: #13

Population: 3.1 million

Share of population 65+: 15.8%

Cost of living: 12% below U.S. average

Average income for 65+ households: $41,194

Average health care costs for a retired couple: Below average at $399,991

Tax rating for retirees: Not Tax Friendly

Low living costs are the big advantage for retirees in the Hawkeye State. Health care costs are especially affordable, at 5.6% below the U.S. average, based on what a 65-year-old retired couple can expect to pay for the rest of their lives. That should help the below-average household income for seniors stretch further. But the tax situation may be burdensome: While Social Security benefits are untaxed, some retirement income may get hit by the high top rate of 8.98%. On the plus side, people age 55 or older can exclude up to $6,000 if single ($12,000 for joint filers) of taxable retirement income.


Tennessee

Overall retirement ranking: #5

Population: 6.5 million

Share of population 65+: 15.0%

Cost of living: 12% below the U.S. average

Average income for 65+ households: $47,891

Average health care costs for a retired couple: Below average at $411,617

Tax rating for retirees: Tax Friendly

The Volunteer State is a good choice for budget-conscious retirees. According to data from the Council for Community and Economic Research, every major metro area offers below-average living costs in almost every category of expenses, including health care--among the biggest financial concerns for aging Americans. Plus, Tennessee does not levy state income taxes, so your retirement income can stretch even further. And being economically healthy, Tennessee should have no issues maintaining its tax-friendliness; it ranks eighth of all states for fiscal soundness, according to a recent report from the Mercatus Center.

Alabama

Overall retirement ranking: #6

Population: 4.8 million

Share of population 65+: 15.3%

Cost of living: 13% below the U.S. average

Average income for 65+ households: $44,934

Average health care costs for a retired couple: Below average at $404,922

Tax rating for retirees: Tax Friendly

Frugal retirees are sure to love the Heart of Dixie. You can get many of Florida's retirement attractions--warm weather, nice beaches and plenty of golf--all at a lower price. The low living costs extend to health care, for which retirees can expect to spend 4.4% less than the average retired American couple. Taxes are easy on the budget, too, with income tax rates ranging from just 2% to 5%, and Social Security benefits being exempt.

How We Ranked Every State for Retirement

To rank all 50 states for retirement, we weighed a number of factors:

*Taxes on retirees, based on Kiplinger's Retiree Tax Map, which divides states into five categories: Most Tax Friendly, Tax Friendly, Mixed, Not Tax Friendly and Least Tax Friendly.
*Cost-of-living for each state, with data provided by Sperling's Best Places, includes overall costs--across all age groups--for housing, food and groceries, transportation, utilities, health care and miscellaneous expenses.
*Average health care costs in retirement are from HealthView Services and include Medicare, supplemental insurance, dental insurance and out-of-pocket costs for a 65-year-old couple who are both retired and are expected to live to 87 (husband) and 89 (wife).
*Rankings of each state's economic health are provided by the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and are based on various factors including state governments' revenue sources, debts, budgets and abilities to fund pensions, health-care benefits and other services.
*Rankings of the health of each state's population of residents 65 and over are from the United Health Foundation and are based on 34 factors ranging from residents' bad habits (smoking and excessive drinking) to the quality of hospital and nursing home care available in the state.
*Household incomes and poverty rates are from the U.S. Census Bureau.
Population data, including the percentage of the population that is age 65 and older, is also provided by the Census Bureau. They are highlighted in these rankings for the benefit of readers, but were not factors in our methodology for ranking the states.



E-mail me when people leave their comments –

You need to be a member of Tea Party Command Center to add comments!

Join Tea Party Command Center

Comments

  • Bonniie

    Yes that law was under the liar-nObama but Trump is correcting and the libs are crying out loud and blaming Trump what a complete ly.

  • gee freaking whiz we do not have to separate families deport them all problem solved

This reply was deleted.