Dates of 2014 State legislative sessions

State Dates of session Session length limit [1]
Ends.png Alabama January 14 - April 15 (Projected)[2] 30 legislative days in 105 calendar days
Ends.png Alaska January 21 - April 20 (Projected) 90 calendar days
Ends.png Arizona January 13 - May 1 (Projected) Saturday of the last week in which the 100th calendar day falls
Ends.png Arkansas February 10 - March 1 (Projected) 60 calendar days
Begins.png California* January 6 - September 30 (Projected) September 12
Begins.png Colorado January 8 - May 7 (Projected) 120 calendar days
Ends.png Connecticut February 5 - May 7 (Projected) Wednesday after the first Monday in June
Ends.png Delaware January 14 - June 30 (Projected) June 30
Ends.png Florida* March 4 - May 2 (Projected) 60 calendar days
Ends.png Georgia January 13 - April 1 (Projected) 40 legislative days
Ends.png Hawaii January 15 - May 1 (Projected) 60 legislative days
Begins.png Idaho January 6 - April 1 (Projected) None
Ends.png Illinois* January 29 - May 31 (Projected) None
Begins.png Indiana January 7 - March 14 (Projected) April 29
Ends.png Iowa January 13 - April 22 (Projected) 110 calendar days
Ends.png Kansas January 13 - May 30 (Projected) None
Begins.png Kentucky January 7 - April 15 (Projected) 30 legislative days or March 30
Ends.png Louisiana March 10 - June 5 (Projected) 45 legislative days in 60 calendar days
Begins.png Maine January 8 - April 16 (Projected) 3rd Wed in June
Begins.png Maryland January 8 - April 7 (Projected) 90 calendar days
Ends.pngMassachusetts* January 14 – January 6, 2015 (Projected) Formal sessions, 3rd Wed in Nov; informal, no limit
Begins.png Michigan* January 8 - December 31 (Projected) None
Ends.png Minnesota February 25 - May 19 (Projected) 120 legislative days in 2 years, or the 1st Monday after the 3rd Saturday in May each year
Begins.png Mississippi January 7 - April 6 (Projected) 90 calendar days
Begins.png Missouri January 8 - May 30 (Projected) May 30
Ends.png Montana No 2014 Regular Session 90 legislative days in two years
Begins.png Nebraska January 8 - April 1 (Projected) 90 legislative days
Ends.png Nevada No 2014 Regular Session 120 calendar days in two years
Begins.png New Hampshire January 8 - June 1 (Projected) 45 legislative days or July 1
Ends.png New Jersey* January 14 - January 1, 2016 (Projected) None
Ends.png New Mexico January 21 - February 20 (Projected) 60 calendar days
Begins.png New York State* January 8 – January 7, 2015 (Projected) None
Ends.png North Carolina May 14 - July 1 (Projected) None
Ends.png North Dakota No 2014 Regular Session 80 legislative days in two years
Begins.png Ohio* January 7 – December 31 (Projected) None
Ends.png Oklahoma February 3 - May 30 (Projected) Last Friday in May
Ends.png Oregon February 3 - March 9 (Projected) 160 calendar days
Begins.pngPennsylvania* January 7 – November 30 (Projected) None
Begins.png Rhode Island January 7 – June 1 (Projected) None
Ends.png South Carolina January 14 - June 30 (Projected) First Thurs in June
Ends.png South Dakota January 14 - March 31 (Projected) 40 legislative days
Ends.png Tennessee January 14 - May 1 (Projected) 90 legislative days
Ends.png Texas No 2014 Regular Session 140 calendar days in two years
Ends.png Utah January 27 - March 13 (Projected) 45 calendar days
Begins.png Vermont January 7 - May 14 (Projected) None
Begins.png Virginia January 8 - March 12 (Projected) 30 calendar days
Ends.png Washington January 13 - March 12 (Projected) 105 calendar days
Begins.png West Virginia January 8 - March 8 (Projected) 60 calendar days
Ends.png Wisconsin* January 14 - December 1 (Projected)[2] None
Ends.png Wyoming February 10 - March 1 (Projected) 40 legislative days

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Comment by Reidun E. Elliott on January 12, 2014 at 10:50am
Interesting that some states have a law that prohibits campaigning while office!
If that we're try of all maybe more real work would get done hmmmm.
Comment by Paul Norwood on January 12, 2014 at 9:10am

No they have until the 12th, but meet between the 6th of January til the 3oth of September but try to be done by the 12th.

Comment by Bob Casper on January 12, 2014 at 8:25am

California is one of the largest States in the US and if I read this right they have one day allotted September 12? WOW no wonder the States has so many fiscal issues...

Comment by Melony B. DeFord on January 12, 2014 at 7:51am

For the record - SOME in the Georgia General Assembly are looking at a 'short session' because it is election year and by law these folks CANNOT campaign while in session. According to the state constitution they WILL have to have a full session....

LIGHTER SIDE

 

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ALERT ALERT

SICK: Leprosy On The Rise In Los Angeles 

Ahh, the joys of open borders and Democrat leadership.

California is not just a public toilet but now there is evidence that leprosy is on the rise in Los Angeles County.

Barack Obama changed US law in 2016 and allowed immigrants with blistering STDs and leprosy to migrate to the US.

Medscape reported:

Leprosy, also known as Hansen’s disease, is rarely seen in the United States, but cases continue to emerge in Los Angeles County, a new report says.

“Hansen’s disease still exists, and we need to educate medical students and physicians,” coauthor Dr. Maria Teresa Ochoa from Keck Medical Center of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, told Reuters Health by email.

Dr. Ochoa and colleagues identified 187 patients with the disease in a review of medical records from their leprosy clinic spanning 1973 to 2018. Most patients were Latino, originating from Mexico, and they experienced a median delay in diagnosis of more than three years, the team reports JAMA Dermatology, online August 7.

Multibacillary leprosy (MB) cases outnumbered paucibacillary leprosy (PB) cases by nearly eight to one (88.6% vs. 11.4%, respectively), and Latino patients were more likely than non-Latino patients to have MB, as were patients from Central or South America (versus other regions).

Most patients (80.7%) received multidrug therapy, and most (92.6%) received antibiotics for more than two years, especially if they had MB.

Only about half of patients (56.7%) had World Health Organization (WHO) grade 0 disability (no signs or symptoms suggestive of leprosy or disability) at the one-year follow-up, whereas 16.0% had grade 1 disability (loss of protective sensation) and 26.2% had grade 2 disability (visible deformity) at the last follow-up.

Among the patients who lost protective sensation, 87.7% (50/57) did not regain it following therapy.

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