Dates of 2014 State legislative sessions

State Dates of session Session length limit [1]
Ends.png Alabama January 14 - April 15 (Projected)[2] 30 legislative days in 105 calendar days
Ends.png Alaska January 21 - April 20 (Projected) 90 calendar days
Ends.png Arizona January 13 - May 1 (Projected) Saturday of the last week in which the 100th calendar day falls
Ends.png Arkansas February 10 - March 1 (Projected) 60 calendar days
Begins.png California* January 6 - September 30 (Projected) September 12
Begins.png Colorado January 8 - May 7 (Projected) 120 calendar days
Ends.png Connecticut February 5 - May 7 (Projected) Wednesday after the first Monday in June
Ends.png Delaware January 14 - June 30 (Projected) June 30
Ends.png Florida* March 4 - May 2 (Projected) 60 calendar days
Ends.png Georgia January 13 - April 1 (Projected) 40 legislative days
Ends.png Hawaii January 15 - May 1 (Projected) 60 legislative days
Begins.png Idaho January 6 - April 1 (Projected) None
Ends.png Illinois* January 29 - May 31 (Projected) None
Begins.png Indiana January 7 - March 14 (Projected) April 29
Ends.png Iowa January 13 - April 22 (Projected) 110 calendar days
Ends.png Kansas January 13 - May 30 (Projected) None
Begins.png Kentucky January 7 - April 15 (Projected) 30 legislative days or March 30
Ends.png Louisiana March 10 - June 5 (Projected) 45 legislative days in 60 calendar days
Begins.png Maine January 8 - April 16 (Projected) 3rd Wed in June
Begins.png Maryland January 8 - April 7 (Projected) 90 calendar days
Ends.pngMassachusetts* January 14 – January 6, 2015 (Projected) Formal sessions, 3rd Wed in Nov; informal, no limit
Begins.png Michigan* January 8 - December 31 (Projected) None
Ends.png Minnesota February 25 - May 19 (Projected) 120 legislative days in 2 years, or the 1st Monday after the 3rd Saturday in May each year
Begins.png Mississippi January 7 - April 6 (Projected) 90 calendar days
Begins.png Missouri January 8 - May 30 (Projected) May 30
Ends.png Montana No 2014 Regular Session 90 legislative days in two years
Begins.png Nebraska January 8 - April 1 (Projected) 90 legislative days
Ends.png Nevada No 2014 Regular Session 120 calendar days in two years
Begins.png New Hampshire January 8 - June 1 (Projected) 45 legislative days or July 1
Ends.png New Jersey* January 14 - January 1, 2016 (Projected) None
Ends.png New Mexico January 21 - February 20 (Projected) 60 calendar days
Begins.png New York State* January 8 – January 7, 2015 (Projected) None
Ends.png North Carolina May 14 - July 1 (Projected) None
Ends.png North Dakota No 2014 Regular Session 80 legislative days in two years
Begins.png Ohio* January 7 – December 31 (Projected) None
Ends.png Oklahoma February 3 - May 30 (Projected) Last Friday in May
Ends.png Oregon February 3 - March 9 (Projected) 160 calendar days
Begins.pngPennsylvania* January 7 – November 30 (Projected) None
Begins.png Rhode Island January 7 – June 1 (Projected) None
Ends.png South Carolina January 14 - June 30 (Projected) First Thurs in June
Ends.png South Dakota January 14 - March 31 (Projected) 40 legislative days
Ends.png Tennessee January 14 - May 1 (Projected) 90 legislative days
Ends.png Texas No 2014 Regular Session 140 calendar days in two years
Ends.png Utah January 27 - March 13 (Projected) 45 calendar days
Begins.png Vermont January 7 - May 14 (Projected) None
Begins.png Virginia January 8 - March 12 (Projected) 30 calendar days
Ends.png Washington January 13 - March 12 (Projected) 105 calendar days
Begins.png West Virginia January 8 - March 8 (Projected) 60 calendar days
Ends.png Wisconsin* January 14 - December 1 (Projected)[2] None
Ends.png Wyoming February 10 - March 1 (Projected) 40 legislative days

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Comment by Reidun E. Elliott on January 12, 2014 at 10:50am
Interesting that some states have a law that prohibits campaigning while office!
If that we're try of all maybe more real work would get done hmmmm.
Comment by Paul Norwood on January 12, 2014 at 9:10am

No they have until the 12th, but meet between the 6th of January til the 3oth of September but try to be done by the 12th.

Comment by Bob Casper on January 12, 2014 at 8:25am

California is one of the largest States in the US and if I read this right they have one day allotted September 12? WOW no wonder the States has so many fiscal issues...

Comment by Melony B. DeFord on January 12, 2014 at 7:51am

For the record - SOME in the Georgia General Assembly are looking at a 'short session' because it is election year and by law these folks CANNOT campaign while in session. According to the state constitution they WILL have to have a full session....

LIGHTER SIDE

ALERT ALERT

Refugee Complains:
‘Too Many Laws’ In Western World

 During a recent interview with local media in Australia, a Sudanese refugee and mother of six suggested that the Australian government deserves the blame for her eldest son’s propensity for crime.

According to Nine News, Asha Awya’s eldest son is an unemployed gang member who has spent time in prison. Instead of pinning the blame for her son’s actions on him, however, Awya feels the Australian government deserves it for passing “too many laws.”

She said so during an appearance last week on the Australian program “A Current Affair,” where she also appeared to slam actual Australians for allegedly not making it easy for refugees to assimilate.

“They (her kids) came from a very traumatized environment, and coming to Australia, trying to fit in with the religion and the friends around them at school, is very challenging,” she said. “We have all these laws, so it’s just very confusing, and I feel sorry for the kids because they don’t know how to deal with this.”

But that’s not all. Awya also complained that the government provides her with too little money.

“The Centrelink money is not enough,” she said, referencing a welfare program operated by the Australian government’s Department of Human Services.

“Sometimes I cut some of their entertainment,” she added, saying in effect that she sometimes stops handing out allowances so as to reduce her costs.

And this, she believes, only serves to incentivize her son’s desire to commit crime.

“If mum always not giving me money, there’s no pocket money, then maybe I have to find a way of stealing and get my own money,” she said, articulating what she believes goes through her son’s mind.

So even though the Australian government graciously (and perhaps naively) allowed this Sundanese woman to migrate to the country, she basically resents this same government because it refuses to lavishly provide for her and her family’s every single need, including their desire for entertainment.

Behold the perfect example of a spoiled-rotten, ungrateful refugees, ladies and gentlemen.

You know, the media often accuse those who criticize their respective governments for allowing refugees to flood their neighborhoods of harboring racist views. If only it were that simple.

Many Westerners, including your truly — a citizen whose family immigrated to the West from India over three decades ago — take issue with the behavior of refugees.

Besides making nary an effort to assimilate, many refugees wind up on welfare, eschewing hard work and effort for a life of government subsistence and oftentimes a life of crime as well.

Now, consider what Awya told “A Current Affair” and answer me this: Is it really “racist” that Westerners such as yours truly prefer that migrants such as her remain in their own country instead of being allowed to migrate to ours?

Please share this story on Facebook and Twitter and let us know what you think about this Sudanese refugee’s disgusting lack of gratitude.

What do you think about this migrant trying to blame her son’s behavior on the Australian government? Scroll down to comment below!

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