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Let's Go Brandon Still Going Strong - Coal Region Canary

Cafeterias in K-12 schools across the country have reportedly faced depleted food supplies and labor shortages because of the coronavirus pandemic, leading some school districts to consider a return to remote learning rather than forcing students to go hungry.

An AL.com story on Monday said Alabama's education department reported every school district in the state is suffering from food and cafeteria workforce shortages. Other school districts throughout the country have faced the same problem, and federal agencies have scrambled to offer assistance.

The reasons cited for the shortages are pandemic-related. Cafeteria workers miss work after becoming sick with COVID-19 or because they're quarantining after being exposed to the virus. At the same time, truck companies have reported difficulties in filling positions, such as drivers to bring food and cutlery to schools, as have food production factories responsible for putting together student meals.
 

While schools have been scrambling, the federal government has tried to offer assistance. On September 29, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced it would provide $1.5 billion in emergency funds to help schools feed students. The agency said in a statement that the funds will "enhance the toolbox for school nutrition professionals working hard to make sure students have reliable access to healthy meals."

read more:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/school-districts-crippled-by-food-supply-shortages-could-have-to-return-to-remote-learning/ar-AAPqzXM?ocid=BingNewsSearch

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  • Excellent recommendation Ron. Once this was required reading in Our High Schools, along with "Brave New World, Lord of the Flies, Animal Farm and Atlas Shrugged." A time when Body Image was as important as readiness, and Physical Education was Mandatory. 

    Lynn Bryant DeSpain

  • Our Mother made my Brother's and mine in a Home where both Parents worked beginning in the Early 50's. It was "Normal" then as No Schools had Provided Lunches. When School Cafeterias began, Our Mom appreciated the reduction in shopping and meal preparations. I missed using the "Wax Paper" to use on the Slide! However, food or not, it is Childrens Education, mentally, emotionally, physically and socially that continues to suffer. Without agenda free educators and parents working towards these common goals, our Society and Nation will continue to fail.

    Lynn Bryant DeSpain

  • Just a thought, but has anyone asked "Mom" how she feels about taking the extra time to make the sandwiches, wrap them up, add the fruit and juice to a bag for each kid before heading "Off to Work" in addition to getting herself ready, because I'm willing to bet that in most Households, Papa ain't gonna do it! Aside from none of this having anything to do with the ever sinking quality of American Education, and "No Actual, Serious, Road Map Suggestions of How To Repair the Damage!"

    Lynn Bryant DeSpain

    • Two of my sons raising children on their own are packing lunches every school day, so dads in fact DO that, and clean house, do laundry, get groceries, take the kiddies to the doctor, plans overningths with friends, birthday parties........yes, responsible parents  can pull it together and make it happen. When we have children we become responsible for feeding them, it isn't the states job!

      My parents did it for 4, and they both worked full time jobs six days a week, mom and dad made ALL the meals for the family, they were both excellent cooks.

      BUT, the story is about using the problem/difficulty with providing lunches to shut down education AGAIN, over something that has NOTHING to do with education!

    • My mother did it for 4.   And my fave was tuna salad sandwiches.   That takes time.   I did for 2.   No, my father didn't do it because he was already gone for work.   Same my ex husband.   

      And, I've heard of single dads that also did it for their kids.

      And, yes there is a cost to the educations based on the article.   I believe they were asking for another $1,500,000.   That might just fund 10 or 15 competent teachers.

      Those sandwiches can be done the night before and just grab from the fridge in the AM.

      They will get used to it when everybody else's money runs out and they have to do that and more to make ends meet.

  • Does anybody seriously think the education levels will increase with the millions of NONENGLISH SPEAKING ALIENS  FLOODING CLASSROOMS AS A RESULT  OF THE OPEN BORDERS BS?

    When I took a job in Panama closing out our bases as a result of the Carter debacle, I looked up literacy in prep for going.   The cited literacy rate was 97%.   What  I learned once on the job was that 6th grade is considered FULLY LITERATE THERE.    Based on the fact that Panama is a cut above Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, and others, I'm gonna guess their literacy rate is less and so is the basis for literacy.   We are calling seniors in high school literate and many, sadly, are not.

    Teachers just are not what they used to be.   My 8th grade teacher was what should have been, and still should be, the rule.   My class had 25 in it.   There was only one class per grade.   In addition to teaching all the basics, Mrs. Hollobaugh took it upon herself to teach us some of the basics of life.   Like, if you want something, you earn it.   Each Wednesday one student would bring a cake to be cut in slices and sold to the 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students for something like a nickel a slice.   We also got candy bars from a bulk place which each student sold and turned inthe money 2 or 3 times a year.   We collected newspapers at home for an annual collection.   We held a Saturday movie for 25 cents once.  There were only x rated theaters at that time.   None at all in our town.  

    The purpose was to pay for our 8th grade trip, our 8th grade dance, our graduation ceremony and to leave a gift for the school.  We did all of that and had sufficient funds that each student fot $15 spending money for on the trip to NYC.      I truly believe that the lessons we learned doing all of this were as valuable as the classes that year.   She was a tough teacher.   Nobody messed with her.   And, she took her job seriously.   She assigned a writing project for each of us to tell her how an occupation contributed to quality of life.   This was preparing for choosing high school courses.   I took it as a writing assignment.   I wrote how hairdressing made every female feel like a princess.  She went ballistic and called for a parent conference.  She said that I should be an architect or a CPA and she wouldn't approve a lesser plan.  Then there was a report that everybody had to do.   I did mine and she gave me a D, while saying that anybody else would have gotten a B.  She graded based on capability.

    Another day, everybody was told to put their head down on the desk and she wanted to take a vote on who would represent the school at a county spelling bee.   
    Then she asked Dale who he'd like to vote for as everyone else had voted for the same person.    He wanted himself.  So, she asked him if he had any objection to the person everybody else had voted for.   Could've knocked me over with a feather.   It was me.  She picked me up that evening and drove me to the event.

    My oldest grandson had such a teacher for TSA,   That is STEM based course that is 4 years. She wrote his recommendation letter for Engineering College.   So, we do still have a few, but they are very far between.

    • I had one or two teachers like her.. and they did it all on a pittance of what they are paid today... the teachers of today are nowhere what they were once.  They are more interested in training up new world compliant individuals with low expectations and even lower ability.  A new age of surfs.

    • That's the truth of it.

  • SERIOUSLY??????? What happened to parents packing lunches for their kids?

    • If it isn't packaged, ready to eat, and in its own bag, it's too much like work... to make sandwiches and put them with a carton of juice, and an apple, orange, or banana in a bag or insulated lunch box.

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