There seems to be a direct relationship between modern lifestyles and declining male fertility and the statistics are alarming.

Records show that the average male sperm count in 1950 was 113 million/ml. By 1998 this had declined to 62 million/ml and the average is believed to be sinking even lower year-by-year.

Sub-fertility is defined as a sperm count of 20 million/ml or less. The main causes are stress and other pressures of modern day life, coupled with the effects of smoking, alcohol and drug consumption, over-eating and lack of exercise.

Many of the solutions therefore rest with the individual but physiological and medical conditions still remain and Bridge has the most advanced treatments for male infertility available in clinical use anywhere in the world.

Male Factor Infertility

Male Factor infertility is one of the most common reasons why couples do not become pregnant.

There are many different causes of male infertility. There may be a shortage of sperm, or a blockage preventing the sperm from being ejaculated, or the sperm may not swim properly, they may stick together, or there may be no sperm produced at all.

If your partner is to become pregnant, several things have to happen. The man must produce millions of healthy, active sperm which pass into the woman's vagina during intercourse. Then the sperm must swim through the womb and into the Fallopian tube to fertilise the egg. The resulting embryo travels on and embeds itself into the womb.

Problems can exist at all stages in this process.

Until fairly recently, there was little that could be done to help - but new advances mean that men who would not have been able to father a child can now do so, and even the most severe types of male infertility can be treated. There are a number of different types of treatment available. The type you are offered will depend on the cause of your infertility.

Remember that male infertility problems are very common, remember also that you are not on your own - we are here to help and you should talk and share how you are feeling with your partner.

We also understand much more today about the impact of lifestyle on male infertility - and smoking, heavy alcohol consumption, overeating, lack of exercise and stress can all contribute to the problem.

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Comment by Karma Miller on November 9, 2018 at 9:53am

        WILL AFFECT IQ AND HEALTH !!  PLUS SO - SO MUCH MORE !!

Comment by Karma Miller on November 9, 2018 at 9:47am
I HEARD THIS SOMETIME AGO ! 50% LESS - COULD THIS BE WHY WE ARE HAVING MESSED UP CHILDREN ?? THINK ABOUT IT !! 50% LESS MAY VERY WELL MEAN LESS GOOD QUALITY ALSO !! ONLY THE BEST GETS THROW FAST TO IMPREGNATE SOMEONE - SO IF THERE IS LESS ! THEN THE QUALITY PROBABLY GOES DOWN !! PLUS THINK ABOUT ALL THE TRASH WE ARE PUTTING INTO OUR BODYS ?? CHEMICALS IN AIR AND IN FOOD WE EAT !! MAY MEAN 50% LESS !

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ALERT ALERT

SICK: Leprosy On The Rise In Los Angeles 

Ahh, the joys of open borders and Democrat leadership.

California is not just a public toilet but now there is evidence that leprosy is on the rise in Los Angeles County.

Barack Obama changed US law in 2016 and allowed immigrants with blistering STDs and leprosy to migrate to the US.

Medscape reported:

Leprosy, also known as Hansen’s disease, is rarely seen in the United States, but cases continue to emerge in Los Angeles County, a new report says.

“Hansen’s disease still exists, and we need to educate medical students and physicians,” coauthor Dr. Maria Teresa Ochoa from Keck Medical Center of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, told Reuters Health by email.

Dr. Ochoa and colleagues identified 187 patients with the disease in a review of medical records from their leprosy clinic spanning 1973 to 2018. Most patients were Latino, originating from Mexico, and they experienced a median delay in diagnosis of more than three years, the team reports JAMA Dermatology, online August 7.

Multibacillary leprosy (MB) cases outnumbered paucibacillary leprosy (PB) cases by nearly eight to one (88.6% vs. 11.4%, respectively), and Latino patients were more likely than non-Latino patients to have MB, as were patients from Central or South America (versus other regions).

Most patients (80.7%) received multidrug therapy, and most (92.6%) received antibiotics for more than two years, especially if they had MB.

Only about half of patients (56.7%) had World Health Organization (WHO) grade 0 disability (no signs or symptoms suggestive of leprosy or disability) at the one-year follow-up, whereas 16.0% had grade 1 disability (loss of protective sensation) and 26.2% had grade 2 disability (visible deformity) at the last follow-up.

Among the patients who lost protective sensation, 87.7% (50/57) did not regain it following therapy.

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