Candidates Who Drink Tea

Alabama
 ■Robert Aderholt, Republican U.S. Representative from Alabama's 4th congressional district (1997–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  
Arizona
 ■Trent Franks, Republican U.S. Representative from Arizona's 2nd congressional district and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■John Shadegg, Republican U.S. Representative from Arizona's 3rd congressional district (1995–2011) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  
California
 ■Jeff Denham, Republican U.S. Representative from California's 19th congressional district (2011–present). In January 2011, Matthew Mosk of ABC News wrote that Denham had campaigned in 2010 "under the Tea Party banner".
  ■Wally Herger, Republican U.S. Representative from California's 2nd congressional district (1987–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Dan Lungren, Republican U.S. Representative from California's 34th (1979–83), 42nd (1983–1989) and 3rd (2005–present) congressional districts. In April 2012, Michael McAuliff of The Huffington Post described Lungren as "Tea Party-affiliated".
  ■Tom McClintock, Republican U.S. Representative from California's 4th congressional district (2009–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Gary Miller, Republican U.S. Representative from California's 41st (1999–2003) and 42nd (2003–present) congressional districts and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Ed Royce, Republican U.S. Representative from California's 39th (1993–2003) and 40th (2003–present) congressional districts and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  
Colorado
 ■Mike Coffman, Republican U.S. Representative from Colorado's 6th congressional district (2009–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.[15] Coffman's 2012 re-election campaign has received the endorsement of FreedomWorks.
  ■Cory Gardner, Republican U.S. Representative from Colorado's 4th congressional district (2011–present). In September 2010, Dan Amira of New York listed Young as one of "dozens of tea-party-associated House of Representatives candidates".
  ■Doug Lamborn, Republican U.S. Representative from Colorado's 5th congressional district (2007–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  
Connecticut
 ■Tom Scott, Republican former state senator. In September 2011, Daniela Altimari of the Hartford Courant wrote that Scott had "ties to the Tea Party movement."
  
Florida
 ■Sandy Adams, Republican U.S. Representative from Florida's 24th congressional district (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus. Adams' 2012 re-election campaign has received the endorsement of the Central Florida Tea Party.
  ■Gus Bilirakis, Republican U.S. Representative from Florida's 9th congressional district (2007–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Dean Cannon, Republican state representative (2004–present) and speaker of the state House of Representatives (2010–present). Cannon expressed support for the tea party movement in June 2010.
  ■Ander Crenshaw, Republican U.S. Representative from Florida's 4th congressional district (2001–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Rich Nugent, Republican U.S. Representative from Florida's 5th congressional district (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Dennis Ross, Republican U.S. Representative from Florida's 12th congressional district (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Steve Southerland, Republican U.S. Representative from Florida's 2nd congressional district (2011–present) and the founder of Bay Patriots, a group aligned with the tea party.
  ■Cliff Stearns, Republican U.S. Representative from Florida's 6th congressional district (1989–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Allen West, Republican U.S. Representative from Florida's 22nd congressional district (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus. West's 2012 re-election campaign has received the endorsement of FreedomWorks.
  
Georgia
 ■Paul Broun, Republican U.S. Representative from Georgia's 10th congressional district (2007–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Herman Cain, 2012 presidential candidate. Cain gave the tea party response to President Barack Obama's 2012 State of the Union Address.
  ■Phil Gingrey, Republican U.S. Representative from Georgia's 11th congressional district (2003–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Tom Price, Republican U.S. Representative from Georgia's 6th congressional district (2005–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.[32] In April 2011, Stephanie Mencimer of Mother Jones described Price as "the tea party's favorite doctor in the House during the health care fight".
  ■Lynn Westmoreland, Republican U.S. Representative from Georgia's 8th (2005–07) and 3rd (2007–present) congressional districts and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.[34] In December 2011, Justin Sink of The Hill described Westmoreland as a "Tea Party favorite".
  
Illinois
 ■Randy Hultgren, Republican U.S. Representative from Illinois's 14th congressional district (2011–present). In January 2012, Edward McClelland of NBC Chicago wrote that Hultgren "aligns with the Tea Party".
  ■Joe Walsh, Republican U.S. Representative from Illinois's 8th congressional district (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.[37] Walsh's 2012 re-election campaign has received the endorsement of FreedomWorks.
  
Indiana
 ■Dan Burton, Republican U.S. Representative from Indiana's 6th (1983–2003) and 5th (2003–present) congressional districts and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Mike Pence, Republican U.S. Representative from Indiana's 2nd (2001–03) and 6th (2003–present) congressional districts and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.[39] In May 2011, Michael Muskal of the Los Angeles Times described Pence, who is running for Governor of Indiana in 2012, as "a 'tea party' favorite".
  ■Todd Young, Republican U.S. Representative from Indiana's 9th congressional district (2011–present). In September 2010, Dan Amira of New York listed Young as one of "dozens of tea-party-associated House of Representatives candidates",[17] and Young's campaign received the endorsement of FreedomWorks.
  
Iowa
 ■Steve King, Republican U.S. Representative from Iowa's 5th congressional district (2003–present) and a founding member of the Tea Party Caucus.[42] King's 2012 re-election campaign has received the endorsement of FreedomWorks.
  
Kansas
 ■Tim Huelskamp, Republican U.S. Representative from Kansas's 1st congressional district (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Lynn Jenkins, Republican U.S. Representative from Kansas's 2nd congressional district (2009–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Jerry Moran, Republican U.S. Senator (2011–present) and a member of the Senate Tea Party Caucus.
  
Kentucky
 ■Rand Paul, Republican U.S. Senator (2011–present) and an inaugural member of the Senate Tea Party Caucus.
  
Louisiana
 ■Rodney Alexander, Republican U.S. Representative from Louisiana's 5th congressional district (2003–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Bill Cassidy, Republican U.S. Representative from Louisiana's 6th congressional district (2009–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■John Fleming, Republican U.S. Representative from Louisiana's 4th congressional district (2009–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Jeff Landry, Republican U.S. Representative from Louisiana's 3rd congressional district (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus. Landry's successful 2010 Republican primary campaign against Hunt Downer received the endorsement of the Tea Party of Louisiana,[48] while his 2012 primary campaign against fellow U.S. Representative Charles Boustany has received the endorsement of FreedomWorks.
  ■Steve Scalise, Republican U.S. Representative from Louisiana's 1st congressional district (2008–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■David Vitter, Republican U.S. Senator (2005–present). In April 2010, David Weigel of The Washington Post wrote that Vitter, during his re-election campaign, ran as " a living, breathing representation of the tea party movement.
  
Maryland
 ■Roscoe Bartlett, Republican U.S. Representative from Maryland's 6th congressional district (1993–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Andrew Harris, Republican U.S. Representative from Maryland's 1st congressional district (2011–present). Harris successfully challenged incumbent Democrat Frank Kratovil in 2010, receiving the endorsement of FreedomWorks.
  
Michigan
 ■Justin Amash, Republican U.S. Representative from Michigan's 3rd congressional district (2011–present). In May 2012, Susan Davis of USA Today described Amash as "Tea Party-aligned".
  ■Mike Bishop, Republican state senator (2003–11) and majority leader. In February 2010 Bishop endorsed the beliefs and ideals of tea party groups.
  ■Pete Hoekstra, Republican U.S. Representative from Michigan's 2nd congressional district (1993–2011) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Tim Walberg, Republican U.S. Representative from Michigan's 7th congressional district (2007–09, 2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  
Minnesota
 ■Michele Bachmann, Republican U.S. Representative from Minnesota's 6th congressional district (2007–present) and founder of the Tea Party Caucus. Bachmann ran for president in 2012, receiving the support of the Tea Party Express. Bachmann also delivered the tea party response to President Barack Obama's 2011 State of the Union Address.
  
Mississippi
 ■Phil Bryant, Republican Governor of Mississippi (2012–present). In March 2012 the Central Mississippi Tea Party dubbed Bryant "the first tea party governor."
  ■Steven Palazzo, Republican U.S. Representative from Mississippi's 4th congressional district (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus. In September 2011, George Altman of gulflive.com described Palazzo as "[2010's] tea party darling".
  
Missouri
 ■Todd Akin, Republican U.S. Representative from Missouri's 2nd congressional district (2001–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus. Akin is running for the U.S. Senate in 2012, and has received the endorsement of Tea Party caucus founders Michele Bachmann and Steve King.
  ■Vicky Hartzler, Republican U.S. Representative from Missouri's 4th congressional district (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Allen Icet, Republican state representative. In April 2010, Jo Mannies of the St. Louis Beacon listed Icet as one of a number of Republicans who "have sought to promote their Tea Party ties."
  ■Billy Long, Republican U.S. Representative from Missouri's 7th congressional district (2011–present). In September 2011, Frank Morris of National Public Radio described Long as "a Tea Party stalwart".
  ■Blaine Luetkemeyer, Republican U.S. Representative from Missouri's 9th congressional district (2009–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Tom Schweich, Republican State Auditor (2011–present). In April 2010, Jo Mannies of the St. Louis Beacon listed Schweich as one of a number of Republicans who "have sought to promote their Tea Party ties."
  
Montana
 ■Denny Rehberg, Republican U.S. Representative from Montana's At-large congressional district (2001–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Derek Skees, Republican state representative. In October 2010, Skees said he "was in the Tea Party before it was cool".
  
Nebraska
 ■Adrian Smith, Republican U.S. Representative from Nebraska's 3rd congressional district and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  
New Hampshire
 ■Charles Bass, Republican U.S. Representative from New Hampshire's 2nd congressional district (1995–2007, 2011–present). In October 2010, Christopher Rowland of The Boston Globe wrote that Bass, in his 2010 campaign, sought "to firm up his conservative credentials with an embrace of the Tea Party movement."
  
New Mexico
 ■Gary Johnson, Republican Governor of New Mexico (1995–2003) and 2012 Libertarian Party presidential nominee. In April 2011, David Weigel of Slate wrote that Johnson "was the Tea Party more than a decade before the idea occurred to Rick Santelli."
  ■Steve Pearce, Republican U.S. Representative from New Mexico's 2nd congressional district and a member of the Tea Party Caucus. Pearce successfully challenged incumbent Democrat Harry Teague in 2010, receiving the endorsement of the Tea Party Express.
  
North Carolina
 ■Richard Burr, Republican U.S. Senator (2005–present). In November 2010, Mary C. Curtis of Politics Daily wrote that Burr had "embraced" the tea party in his 2010 re-election campaign.
  ■Howard Coble, Republican U.S. Representative from North Carolina's 6th congressional district (1985–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Virginia Foxx, Republican U.S. Representative from North Carolina's 5th congressional district (2005–present). In April 2012, Katrina Trinko of National Review described Foxx as a "tea-party congresswoman".
  ■Sue Myrick, Republican U.S. Representative from North Carolina's 9th congressional district (1995–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  
North Dakota
 ■Rick Berg, Republican U.S. Representative from North Dakota's At-large congressional district. Berg successfully challenged Democratic incumbent Earl Pomeroy in 2010 with tea party support.
  ■Kevin Cramer, Republican member of the North Dakota Public Service Commission (2003–present) and 2012 nominee for the U.S. House of Representatives in North Dakota's At-large congressional district. Cramer spoke at a tea party rally in July 2012,[77] and has received the endorsement of FreedomWorks.
  ■Gary Emineth, former chair of the North Dakota Republican Party and a founding member of the North Dakota Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Duane Sand, Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate in 2000 and 2012 and for the U.S. House of Representatives in 2004 and 2008. Sand was a founding member of the North Dakota Tea Party Caucus.
  
Ohio
 ■Kevin Coughlin, Republican state senator (2001–10). Coughlin spoke to the Strongsville Ohio Tea Party group in August 2010.
  ■Bob Gibbs, Republican U.S. Representative from Ohio's 18th congressional district (2011–present). Gibbs successfully challenged Democratic incumbent Zack Space in 2010 with the support of tea party groups.
  ■Jon Husted, Ohio Secretary of State (2011–present). In his 2010 campaign, Husted sought the support of the tea party movement.
  ■Bill Johnson, Republican U.S. Representative from Ohio's 6th congressional district (2011–present). Johnson successfully challenged Democratic incumbent Charlie Wilson in 2010 with the support of tea party groups.
  ■Jim Jordan, Republican U.S. Representative from Ohio's 4th congressional district (2007–present). In July 2011, Damien Gayle of Mail Online described Jordan as "Tea-Party backed".
  ■John Kasich, Republican Governor of Ohio (2011–present). In January 2010, Kasich said "I think I was in the Tea Party before there was a Tea Party."
  ■Josh Mandel, Republican State Treasurer (2011–present). Mandel is running for the U.S. Senate in 2012 with the endorsement of the Tea Party Express.
  ■Steve Stivers, Republican U.S. Representative from Ohio's 15th congressional district (2011–present). In his 2010 campaign, Stivers sought the support of local tea party groups.
  ■Pat Tiberi, Republican U.S. Representative from Ohio's 12th congressional district (2001–present). In August 2011, Tiberi spoke to the Licking County Tea Party.
  ■Brad Wenstrup, Republican nominee for the U.S. House of Representatives in Ohio's 2nd congressional district in 2012. In March 2012, Alex M. Parker of U.S. News & World Report described Wenstrup's successful campaign against incumbent Jean Schmidt, also a Republican, as "yet another scalp for the Tea Party".
  
Oklahoma
 ■Tom Coburn, Republican U.S. Senator (2005–present). In July 2011, Jennifer Steinhauer of The New York Times described Coburn as "a Tea Partier long before the movement even had a name".
  ■Mary Fallin, Republican Governor of Oklahoma (2011–present). In her 2010 gubernatorial campaign Fallin sought the support of tea party voters.
  ■James Lankford, Republican U.S. Representative from Oklahoma's 5th congressional district (2011–present). In June 2012, Tanya Snyder of Streetsblog Capitol Hill described Lankford as "a Tea Party Republican".
  
Oregon
 ■Art Robinson, 2010 and 2012 Republican candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives in Oregon's 4th congressional district. In June 2012, Jeff Mapes of The Oregonian described Robinson as "a favorite of Tea Party activists".
  
Pennsylvania
 ■Mike Fitzpatrick, Republican U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania's 8th congressional district (2005–07, 2011–present). In April 2012, Andrea Stone of The Huffington Post described Fitzpatrick as "a Tea Party favorite".
  ■Mike Kelly, Republican U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania's 3rd congressional district (2011–present). Kelly was a co-founder of the tea party movement in his area.
  ■Sam Rohrer, Republican state representative (1993–2010). In February 2012, Jon Delano of CBS Pittsburgh wrote that "Rohrer ran for Governor as the conservative Tea Party Republican" in 2010.
  ■Rick Santorum, Republican U.S. Senator (1995–2007) and 2012 presidential candidate. During his presidential campaign Santorum sought the support of the tea party movement.
  ■Tom Smith, Republican nominee for the U.S. Senate in 2012. Smith's campaign has received the backing of the Tea Party Express, FreedomWorks and Pennsylvanian tea party groups.
  ■Pat Toomey, Republican U.S. Senator (2011–present). In October 2011, Peter Schroeder of The Hill described Toomey as "the de facto Tea Party voice on Congress's 'supercommittee'".
  
Rhode Island
 ■Jon Brien, Democratic state representative. Brien's 2010 re-election campaign received the endorsement of the Rhode Island Tea Party.
  ■Michael Pinga, Democratic state senator. Pinga's 2010 re-election campaign received the endorsement of the Rhode Island Tea Party.
  ■John Robitaille, Republican nominee for Governor of Rhode Island in 2010. Robitaille, in response to the question "do you consider yourself somebody who embodies the ideals of the [tea party] movement?", responded in October 2010 "I do, I do."
  
South Carolina
 ■Jim DeMint, Republican U.S. Senator (2005–present) and the founder of the Senate's Tea Party Caucus.[101] In January 2012, Jim Davenport of The Huffington Post described DeMint as "a dean of the influential and well-funded tea party movement".
  ■Jeff Duncan, Republican U.S. Representative from South Carolina's 3rd congressional district (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Trey Gowdy, Republican U.S. Representative from South Carolina's 4th congressional district (2011–present). In July 2011, Kara Brandeisky of The New Republic described Gowdy as a "Tea Party congressman". 

  ■Nikki Haley, Republican Governor of South Carolina (2011–present). Haley was elected in 2010 with tea party support,[104] and in her 2012 book Can't Is Not an Option wrote "one of the main reasons that the Tea Party and I are such a natural fit is that they understand the importance of putting principles before politics".
  ■Mick Mulvaney, Republican U.S. Representative from South Carolina's 5th congressional district (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.[13] Mulvaney successfully challenged Democratic incumbent John Spratt in 2010, receiving the backing of the tea party.
  ■Mark Sanford, Republican Governor of South Carolina (2003–11). Sanford has described himself as "Tea Party before the Tea Party was cool".
  ■Tim Scott, Republican U.S. Representative from South Carolina's 1st congressional district (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Joe Wilson, Republican U.S. Representative from South Carolina's 2nd congressional district (2001–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus. In November 2009 Wilson spoke at tea party events at Ford Mansion in Morristown, New Jersey[109] and at Capitol Hill.
  ■Tom Davis (South Carolina politician)
  
South Dakota
 ■Kristi Noem, Republican U.S. Representative from South Dakota's At-large congressional district (2011–present). In October 2010, Aliyah Shahid of the Daily News described Noem as "the new Tea Party star".
  
Tennessee
 ■Diane Black, Republican U.S. Representative from Tennessee's 6th congressional district (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Marsha Blackburn, Republican U.S. Representative from Tennessee's 7th congressional district (2003–present). In November 2010, Molly K. Hooper of The Hill described Blackburn as "a popular figure with the Tea Party movement".
  ■Bob Corker, Republican U.S. Senator (2007–present). During his 2012 re-election campaign, Corker received the praise of Tennessee tea party leaders.
  ■Scott DesJarlais, Republican U.S. Representative from Tennessee's 4th congressional district (2011–present). In December 2011, Chris Carroll of the Chattanooga Times Free Press wrote that DesJarlais "went full tea party" in his 2010 campaign.
  ■Jimmy Duncan, Republican U.S. Representative from Tennessee's 2nd congressional district (1988–present). Duncan met with the Knoxville Tea Party in September 2010.
  ■Stephen Fincher, Republican U.S. Representative from Tennessee's 8th congressional district (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Chuck Fleischmann, Republican U.S. Representative from Tennessee's 3rd congressional district (2011–present). Fleischmann spoke at a meeting of the Tea Party of Bradley County in October 2011.
  ■Phil Roe, Republican U.S. Representative from Tennessee's 1st congressional district (2009–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  
Texas
 ■Joe Barton, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 6th congressional district (1985–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus. Barton described himself in October 2010 as having been "Tea Party when Tea Party wasn't cool."
  ■Kevin Brady, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 8th congressional district (1997–present). Brady marched in a tea party protest in September 2009.
  ■Michael Burgess, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 26th congressional district (2003–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Quico Canseco, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 23rd congressional district (2011–present). In his 2010 campaign, Canseco allied himself with the tea party.
  ■John Carter, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 31st congressional district (2003–present), the secretary of the House Republican Conference and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Ted Cruz, Republican state Solicitor General (2003–08). Cruz is running for the U.S. Senate in 2012 with the support of FreedomWorks and the Tea Party Express, while in May 2012 David Grant of The Christian Science Monitor wrote that "in many ways [Cruz is] the ideal tea party candidate."
  ■John Culberson, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 7th congressional district (2001–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■David Dewhurst, Republican Lieutenant Governor of Texas (2003–present). In April 2012 Gary Scharrer of the Huston Chronicle wrote that Dewhurst "emphasizes that he embraced the core principles of the Tea Party, before that movement gained momentum".
  ■Blake Farenthold, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 27th congressional district (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Louie Gohmert, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 1st congressional district (2005–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Ralph Hall, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 4th congressional district (1981–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Jeb Hensarling, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 5th congressional district (2003–present) and chair of the House Republican Conference (2011–present). Hensarling's 2010 campaign to be chair received the support of Tea Party Republicans.
  ■Kay Bailey Hutchison, Republican U.S. Senator (1993–present). In January 2011, Hutchison said "all in all, I have the support of the tea party people."
  ■Craig James, Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate in 2012. James attended a tea party event in Waco in January 2012.
  ■Kenny Marchant, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 24th congressional district (2005–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Michael McCaul, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 10th congressional district (2005–present). McCaul attended a tea party protest in April 2009.
  ■Debra Medina, Republican candidate for Governor of Texas in 2010. In January 2011 Richard Dunham of the Houston Chronicle described Medina as "the original Texas Tea Party leader."
  ■Randy Neugebauer, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 19th congressional district (2003–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Ron Paul, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 22nd (1976–77, 1979–85) and 14th (1997–present) congressional districts and 1988, 2008 and 2012 presidential candidate. In November 2010, Joshua Green of The Atlantic described Paul as the tea party's "intellectual godfather".
  ■Rick Perry, Republican Governor of Texas (2000–present). Perry unsuccessfully sought the Republican presidential nomination in 2012, receiving the support of the tea party.
  ■Ted Poe, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 2nd congressional district (2005–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Pete Sessions, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 5th (1997–2003) and 32nd (2003–present) congressional districts, chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Lamar Smith, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 21st congressional district (1987–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Steve Stockman, Republican U.S. Representative from Texas's 9th congressional district (1995–97). Stockman is running for the U.S. House of Representatives again in 2012 in Texas's 36th congressional district, and said in July 2012 that "a strong 'tea party group'" had backed his campaign.
  ■Michael Williams, Republican Railroad Commissioner (1999–2011). In January 2011 Richard Dunham of the Houston Chronicle wrote that Williams had "strong Tea Party support."
  
Utah
 ■Rob Bishop, Republican U.S. Representative from Utah's 1st congressional district (2003–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus. Bishop has appeared at Tea Party rallies in Utah.
  ■Jason Chaffetz, Republican U.S. Representative from Utah's 3rd congressional district (2009–present). In August 2011, Amy Walter of ABC News described Chaffetz as "a rising star in the Tea Party movement".
  ■Orrin Hatch, Republican U.S. Senator (1977–present). During Hatch's 2012 re-election campaign, Dan Liljenquist, the senator's opponent, said Hatch had "made a determined effort to reach out to [tea party groups] and to donate to their causes and help them out".
  ■Mike Lee, Republican U.S. Senator (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■Dan Liljenquist, Republican state senator (2009–11). Liljenquist unsuccessfully ran for the U.S. Senate in 2012, receiving the endorsement of FreedomWorks.
  ■Mia Love, Republican mayor of Saratoga Springs (2010–present). Love is running for the U.S. House of Representatives in Utah's 4th congressional district in 2010 with the endorsement of FreedomWorks.
  ■Morgan Philpot, Republican state representative (2001–04). Philpot unsuccessfully ran for the U.S. House of Representatives in Utah's 2nd congressional district in 2010 against Democratic incumbent Jim Matheson. Max Pappas, the managing director of FreedomWorks, said in September 2010 that FreedomWorks "activists in Utah love [Philpot], and they're working hard for him."
  
Virginia
 ■Eric Cantor, Republican U.S. Representative from Virginia's 7th congressional district (2001–present) and House Majority Leader (2011–present). In October 2011, Daniel Stone of Newsweek described Cantor as "the Republican leadership's tether to the Tea Party".
  ■Ken Cuccinelli, Republican state Attorney General (2010–present). In December 2010, Mark Rozell of George Mason University described Cuccinelli as having been "Tea Party before anybody came up with the idea."
  ■Virgil Goode, U.S. Representative from Virginia's 5th congressional district (1997–2009, as a Democrat until 2000, an independent from 2000 to 2002, and a Republican thereafter) and 2012 Constitution Party presidential nominee. Ed Lynch, a professor at Hollins University, said in June 2011 that Goode's campaign would appeal to tea party activists.
  ■Morgan Griffith, Republican U.S. Representative from Virginia's 9th congressional district (2011–present). Griffith addressed the Roanoke Tea Party in September 2010.
  ■Robert Hurt, Republican U.S. Representative from Virginia's 5th congressional district (2011–present). In June 2010, the leader of the Danville Tea Party said his organisation would support Hurt's campaign.
  ■Scott Rigell, Republican U.S. Representative from Virginia's 2nd congressional district (2011–present). In August 2010, Rigell signed a pledge written by local tea party groups.
  
Washington
 ■Jaime Herrera Beutler, Republican U.S. Representative from Washington's 3rd congressional district (2011–present). Beutler was elected in 2010 with tea party support.
  ■Kirby Wilbur, chair of the Washington State Republican Party (2011–present). In January 2011, Kasie Hunt of Politico described Wilbur as "tea party-affiliated".
  
West Virginia
 ■Bill Maloney, Republican nominee for Governor of West Virginia in 2011. In May 2011, David Catanese of Politico described Maloney's victory in the gubernatorial primary as "the most substantial signal to date that the tea party movement continues to resonate six months after its historical midterm victories."
  ■David McKinley, Republican U.S. Representative from West Virginia's 1st congressional district (2011–present) and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  ■John Raese, Republican nominee for the U.S. Senate in 1982, 2006, 2010 and 2012. Raese's 2010 campaign received the endorsement of FreedomWorks.
  
Wisconsin
 ■Sean Duffy, Republican U.S. Representative from Wisconsin's 7th congressional district (2011–present). In July 2011, Robert Draper of The New York Times described Duffy as a "Tea Party sensation".
  ■Ron Johnson, Republican U.S. Senator (2011–present). In January 2011, Johnson declined to join the Senate Tea Party Caucus but said he had "great respect for the tea party movement." In April 2012, Ben Pershing of The Washington Post described Johnson as "a favorite of national tea party Republicans".
  ■Rebecca Kleefisch, Republican Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin (2011–present). Kleefisch won a recall election in 2012 with the endorsement of the Tea Party Express.
  ■Frank Lasee, Republican state senator (2011–present). Lasee briefly ran for the U.S. Senate in 2012 with the backing of tea party activists.
  ■David Prosser, Jr., Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice (1998–present) and member of the Wisconsin State Assembly (1979–97). Prosser's 2011 re-election campaign received the support of the Tea Party Express.
  ■Reid Ribble, Republican U.S. Representative from Wisconsin's 8th congressional district (2011–present). Ribble successfully challenged incumbent Democrat Steve Kagen in 2010 with the support of the tea party.
  ■Paul Ryan, Republican U.S. Representative from Wisconsin's 1st congressional district (1999–present) and chair of the House Budget Committee (2011–present). In April 2011, Ryan topped an online poll of potential Republican presidential candidates conducted by MyTeaParty.org.
  ■Scott Walker, Republican Governor of Wisconsin (2011–present). Scott won a recall election in 2012 with the support of activists associated with the tea party movement.
  
Wyoming
 ■Cynthia Lummis, Republican U.S. Representative from Wyoming's At-large congressional district (2009–present) and a founding member of the Tea Party Caucus.

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References - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Tea_Party_politicians

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