Worship

 
True spiritual worship is the recognition and reverence of God 
as the Lord of life. We bow down before God, we esteem Him, 
and we lift up His glorious name, individually and in large or 
small congregations. In our praying, singing, and work, we 
should worship the Lord with passion, devotion, and honest 
daily living. Worship is not a dull, lifeless ritual or routine, but 
a joyful experience of God’s presence.

During Christ’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem, the people sang
praises and spread palm branches in the path before Him. Some 
Pharisees told Jesus to stop His disciples from doing this. Jesus 
said that if His followers were to stop praising Him, the rocks 
would cry out (Luke 19:39-40 NIV).

However, God does not accept sham worship or vain repetitions. 
Worship means loving the Lord with our heart, mind, soul, and 
strength. Consider true worship as a way of life.


1. Exodus 4:29–31.

What moved the Israelites to worship the Lord? 
How can we worship God wherever we are?


2. Job 1:18–20.

How did Job respond to the news of the deaths of his children? 
What attitude should we have toward God in good times and bad? 
Why?


3. Isaiah 6:1–8.

Where was God in Isaiah’s vision? 
What message did the angelic beings express? 
What initial response did Isaiah make? 
What did he plead in verse 8?


4. Ezekiel 8:14–16.

Some Hebrews worshiped Tammuz, the god of nature. 
What were the twenty-five men worshiping, their backs to the temple? 
They made cakes of bread for the pagan Queen of Heaven 
(Jeremiah 7:18; 44:17–19, 25). 
What other forms of worship did they practice? 
Why was this wrong? How did God react?

5. Matthew 2:10–11.

Wise men journeyed to Bethlehem after Jesus was born, 
giving gifts to Jesus at His home, and they worshiped Him. 
Why do we worship Jesus? (Philippians 2:5–11).


6. Matthew 14:28–33. 
When Peter called out to the Lord on the water, 
what did he attempt to do? 
What distracted him and made him afraid? 
What did Jesus ask him as He reached out to rescue him? 
What was the response of the disciples?


7. Matthew 28:16–17.

When the disciples met Jesus 
before His ascension, what did they do? 
What was the reaction of some? 
How do we worship the Lord? Your answers will vary.


8. John 4:20–24.

What did Jesus teach the woman at the well about worship? 
What are the two vital elements of worship?


9. Colossians 2:18.

Paul warned against the worship of angels. 
What early tendency did men have with regard to worship? 
(Romans 1:25). 
Does this kind of worship continue to this day? 
Who alone is to be worshiped?


10. Revelation 5:13–14.

All creatures in the universe will worship God and the Lamb. 
The twenty-four elders represent all the redeemed who will 
worship. Share some worship experiences.


Postlude
 
When John Wesley was listening to the preface of Martin Luther’s 
commentary on Romans, he said he felt his heart “strangely warmed.” 
As you search through the Scriptures and discuss the questions in this 
book, or meditate on them at home, I pray that your heart will be 
strangely warmed, as well. And may these Bible studies help keep 
Jesus and your relationship to Him the central focus of your life.


From 102 Fascinating Bible Studies by Preston A. Taylor

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Amen-Amein Sister in Christ Jesus-Yeshua Linda!!

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ALERT ALERT

SICK: Leprosy On The Rise In Los Angeles 

Ahh, the joys of open borders and Democrat leadership.

California is not just a public toilet but now there is evidence that leprosy is on the rise in Los Angeles County.

Barack Obama changed US law in 2016 and allowed immigrants with blistering STDs and leprosy to migrate to the US.

Medscape reported:

Leprosy, also known as Hansen’s disease, is rarely seen in the United States, but cases continue to emerge in Los Angeles County, a new report says.

“Hansen’s disease still exists, and we need to educate medical students and physicians,” coauthor Dr. Maria Teresa Ochoa from Keck Medical Center of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, told Reuters Health by email.

Dr. Ochoa and colleagues identified 187 patients with the disease in a review of medical records from their leprosy clinic spanning 1973 to 2018. Most patients were Latino, originating from Mexico, and they experienced a median delay in diagnosis of more than three years, the team reports JAMA Dermatology, online August 7.

Multibacillary leprosy (MB) cases outnumbered paucibacillary leprosy (PB) cases by nearly eight to one (88.6% vs. 11.4%, respectively), and Latino patients were more likely than non-Latino patients to have MB, as were patients from Central or South America (versus other regions).

Most patients (80.7%) received multidrug therapy, and most (92.6%) received antibiotics for more than two years, especially if they had MB.

Only about half of patients (56.7%) had World Health Organization (WHO) grade 0 disability (no signs or symptoms suggestive of leprosy or disability) at the one-year follow-up, whereas 16.0% had grade 1 disability (loss of protective sensation) and 26.2% had grade 2 disability (visible deformity) at the last follow-up.

Among the patients who lost protective sensation, 87.7% (50/57) did not regain it following therapy.

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