The Federalist Papers

The Importance of the Union (1-14)

 

FEDERALIST No. 1    General Introduction Alexander Hamilton


FEDERALIST No. 2   Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence John Jay


FEDERALIST No. 3    Concerning Dangers From Foreign Force and Influence (con't) John Jay


FEDERALIST No. 4   Concerning Dangers From Foreign Force and Influence (con't) John Jay


FEDERALIST No. 5    Concerning Dangers From Foreign Force and Influence (con't) John Jay


FEDERALIST No. 6   Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States Alexander Hamilton


FEDERALIST No. 7    Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States (con't) Alexander Hamilton


FEDERALIST No. 8    The Consequences of Hostilities Between the States Alexander Hamilton


FEDERALIST No. 9    The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection Alexander Hamilton


FEDERALIST No. 10    The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection (con't) James Madison


FEDERALIST No. 11    The Utility of the Union in Respect to Commercial Relations and a Navy Alexander Hamilton


FEDERALIST No. 12   The Utility of the Union In Respect to Revenue Alexander Hamilton


FEDERALIST No. 13    Advantage of the Union in Respect to Economy in Government Alexander Hamilton


FEDERALIST No. 14   Objections to the Proposed Constitution From Extent of Territory Answered James Madison

 

Defects of the Articles of Confederation (15-22)


FEDERALIST No. 15  The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union Alexander Hamilton

FEDERALIST No. 16    The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (con't) Alexander Hamilton


FEDERALIST No. 17    The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (con't) Alexander Hamilton


FEDERALIST No. 18    The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (con't) Alexander Hamilton and James Madison


FEDERALIST No. 19   The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (con't) Alexander Hamilton and James Madison


FEDERALIST No. 20    The Insufficiency fo the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (con't) Alexander Hamilton and James Madison


FEDERALIST No. 21   Other Defects of the Present Confederation Alexander Hamilton


FEDERALIST No. 22    Other Defects of the Present Confederation (con't) Alexander Hamilton


Arguments for the Type of Government Contained in the Constitution (23-36)


FEDERALIST No. 23    The Necessity of a Government as Energetic as the One Proposed to the Preservation of the Union Alexander Hamilton


FEDERALIST No. 24    The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 25    The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered (con't) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 26    The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 27    The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered (con't) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 28    The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered (con't) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 29    Concerning the Militia Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 30    Concerning the General Power of Taxation Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 31    Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con't) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 32    Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con't) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 33    Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con't) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 34    Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con't) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 35    Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con't) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 36    Concerning the General Power of Taxation (con't) Alexander Hamilton


The Republican Form of Government (37-51)


FEDERALIST No. 37    Concerning the Difficulties of the Convention in Devising a Proper Form of Government James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 38    The Same Subject Continued, and the Incoherence of the Objections to the New Plan Exposed James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 39    The Conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 40    The Powers of the Convention to Form a Mixed Government Examined and Sustained James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 41    General View of the Powers Conferred by The Constitution James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 42    The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 43    The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered (con't) James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 44    Restrictions on the Authority of the Several States James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 45    The Alleged Danger From the Powers of the Union to the State Governments Considered James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 46    The Influence of the State and Federal Governments Compared James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 47    The Particular Structure of the New Government and the Distribution of Power Among Its Different Parts James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 48    These Departments Should Not Be So Far Separated as to Have No Constitutional Control Over Each Other James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 49    Method of Guarding Against the Encroachments of Any One Department of Government by Appealing to the People Through a Convention Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 50    Periodical Appeals to the People Considered Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 51    The Structure of the Government Must Furnish the Proper Checks and Balances Between the Different Departments Alexander Hamilton or James Madison


The Legislative Branch (52-66)


FEDERALIST No. 52    The House of Representatives Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 53    The House of Representatives (con't) Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 54    The Apportionment of Members Among the States Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 55    The Total Number of the House of Representatives Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 56    The Total Number of the House of Representatives (con't) Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 57    The Alleged Tendency of the New Plan to Elevate the Few at the Expense of the Many Considered in Connection with Representation Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 58    Objection That The Number of Members Will Not Be Augmented as the Progress of Population Demands Considered James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 59    Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 60    Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members (con't) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 61    Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members (con't) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 62    The Senate Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 63    The Senate (con't) Alexander Hamilton or James Madison
FEDERALIST No. 64    The Powers of the Senate John Jay
FEDERALIST No. 65    The Powers of the Senate (con't) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 66    Objections to the Power of the Senate To Set as a Court for Impeachments Further Considered Alexander Hamilton


The Executive Branch (67-77)


FEDERALIST No. 67    The Executive Department Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 68    The Mode of Electing the President Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 69    The Real Character of the Executive Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 70    The Executive Department Further Considered Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 70    The Executive Department Further Considered Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 71    The Duration in Office of the Executive Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 72    The Same Subject Continued, and Re-Eligibility of the Executive Considered Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 73    The Provision For The Support of the Executive, and the Veto Power Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 74    The Command of the Military and Naval Forces, and the Pardoning Power of the Executive Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 75    The Treaty-Making Power of the Executive Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 76    The Appointing Power of the Executive Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 77    The Appointing Power Continued and Other Powers of the Executive Considered Alexander Hamilton


The Judicial Branch (78-83)


FEDERALIST No. 78    The Judiciary Department Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 79    The Judiciary (con't) Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 80    The Powers of the Judiciary Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 81    The Judiciary Continued, and the Distribution of the Judicial Authority Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 82    The Judiciary Continued Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 83    The Judiciary Continued in Relation to Trial by Jury Alexander Hamilton


Conclusions and Miscellaneous Ideas


FEDERALIST No. 84    Certain General and Miscellaneous Objections to the Constitution Considered and Answered Alexander Hamilton
FEDERALIST No. 85    Concluding Remarks Alexander Hamilton

LIGHTER SIDE

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A Happy Thanksgiving 

Thanksgiving Proclamation, 3 October 1789

Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor—and whereas both Houses of Congress have by their joint Committee requested me “to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness.”

Now therefore I do recommend and assign Thursday the 26th day of November next to be devoted by the People of these States to the service of that great and glorious Being, who is the beneficent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be—That we may then all unite in rendering unto him our sincere and humble thanks—for his kind care and protection of the People of this Country previous to their becoming a Nation—for the signal and manifold mercies, and the favorable interpositions of his Providence which we experienced in the course and conclusion of the late war—for the great degree of tranquility, union, and plenty, which we have since enjoyed—for the peaceable and rational manner, in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government for our safety and happiness, and particularly the national One now lately instituted—for the civil and religious liberty with which we are blessed; and the means we have of acquiring and diffusing useful knowledge; and in general for all the great and various favors which he hath been pleased to confer upon us.

And also that we may then unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations and beseech him to pardon our national and other transgressions—to enable us all, whether in public or private stations, to perform our several and relative duties properly and punctually—to render our national government a blessing to all the people, by constantly being a Government of wise, just, and constitutional laws, discreetly and faithfully executed and obeyed—to protect and guide all Sovereigns and Nations (especially such as have shewn kindness unto us) and to bless them with good government, peace, and concord—To promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue, and the increase of science among them and us—and generally to grant unto all Mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best.

Given under my hand at the City of New-York the third day of October in the year of our Lord 1789.

George Washington
President of the United States of America

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