With Teladoc, the Doctor Will See You Now ... Really!

With Teladoc, the
Doctor Will See You Now ... Really!

by Cal Thomas
{townhall.com} ~ If you're tired of the dysfunction in Washington -- the backbiting, the questioning of motives, the failure to agree on much of anything, the one-upmanship, the allegations about a "stolen" presidential election, Russian "collusion," the posturing and boorish behavior -- how about focusing on something that is working and benefits a growing number of people?

Consider a company called Teladoc, which provides access to a doctor through a computer screen, telephone, or mobile app. The waiting time, a company official tells me, is between eight and ten minutes. That beats any doctor's office I have ever been in, even with an appointment. The company claims a 95 percent satisfaction rate with 92 percent of issues resolved after the first visit.

Here's how it works. Say your child wakes up in the middle of the night with a fever or some other health issue. You go to your computer, phone or mobile app and describe the symptoms to the doctor, who then prescribes treatment. It can be in the form of a prescription or, if the symptoms seem more serious, the doctor will recommend a specialist or a trip to the hospital. The doctor has previously been provided your family's medical history through the app.

Teladoc services are offered through a subscribing company's insurance plan. The company currently serves 10,000 clients and 20 million members, according to a company spokeswoman. All physicians are board certified and licensed in their respective states. They are available any hour of the day or night and every day of the year. Is your doctor that accessible? Unless you live with one, probably not.

The cost? A low $40 to $45 per session.

Jason Gorevic, Teladoc's CEO, tells me: "Consumers of health care are looking for a better way. Regardless of the political environment, there is a growing demand for a better way to provide medical services to individuals."

Gorevic says Teladoc is especially helpful to people living in rural areas where a doctor is not close by, or unavailable.

Reporting on this growing and popular trend in telemedicine, health care writer Bruce Japsen wrote in Forbes magazine: "Health plans see a way for patients to get high-quality care from a physician and the potential to avoid a more expensive trip to a hospital emergency room." Teladoc executives also say they are seeing growth opportunities in mental health, dermatology and smoking cessation programs.

Japsen adds that the field of virtual medicine is growing about ten percent per year with projections it will soon reach 26.9 million, which seems likely given the current spurt.

Gorevic sees increasing interest from health plans that contract with state Medicaid programs for poor Americans, as well as Medicare Advantage plans that provide benefits to seniors. This could save time and money by reducing trips to emergency rooms for less serious ailments.

Let's review: A health plan that bypasses government bureaucracy; rapid access to a doctor who knows a family's medical history; prompt treatment, or quick referral; low cost -- what's not to like?

It is another example of how the private sector, when it is allowed to innovate and flourish, outshines the federal government almost every time.

Virtual medicine, led by companies like Teladoc, is not the wave of the future, but of the present.

If you're unhappy with increasingly expensive, impersonal and slow access to medical care -- and some liberal politicians are already pushing for single-payer, which would likely make waiting times longer and lower the quality of treatment -- you might feel a lot better, while saving money and time, by going virtual.

Views: 30

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Ok, you are saying that these people are doing a better job, right?

Tif 

It sure sounds like it, doesn't it.

Thank you Rudy, are they nation wide?

Tif

Not sure but you can do a search and find out.

Thank you

RSS

LIGHTER SIDE

 

Political Cartoons by Pat Cross

Political Cartoons by Chip Bok

Political Cartoons by Michael Ramirez

ALERT ALERT

 Gun Control Crowd Silent After Black Female
 Kills Three In Maryland Shooting 

A 26-year-old female stormed a RiteAid distribution center with a pistol this morning in Aberdeen, MD, killing three before turning the weapon on herself, according to police.

“Our suspect is a lone female suspect, age 26, who had a last known address in Baltimore County. She has died at the hospital from fatal injury, a self-inflicted gunshot wound,” Harford County Sheriff Jeff Gahler said.

The shooter has been identified by multiple news outlets as Snochia Moseley, a disgruntled temporary employee who also happens to be a black female.

Normally in the case of a mass shooting incident like this, Twitter would be ablaze with calls for gun control measures, inane nonsense about terrorism, labels of toxic masculinity and dismantling gun rights groups like the NRA.

But something is different about today’s shooting: it was not carried out by a white male, leading to deafening silence from the usual suspects in the anti-gun world.

Moms Demand Action, a gun control group partnered with far left Everytown for Gun Safety, has been silent except for a generic “condolences” message posted to its Twitter page.

The group’s founder, ever-outspoken Shannon Watts, has not said a word about the shooting on her active Twitter feed.

There has been nothing but silence from petulant David Hogg, face of the Hitler youth pre-pubescent gun control crowd, who rose to national prominence after the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in February which killed 17.

Leftist activist Michael Moore has not weighed in, either (literally or figuratively).

Nor is cable news playing the story on repeat with live coverage, a “BREAKING NEWS” chyron, and gun-control activists on call as guests during every segment.

If all of these “activists” truly believed in the cause, shouldn’t the standard be the same regardless of the ethnicity and gender of the shooter?

Big League Politics reached out to Shannon Watts to ask her just that. She did not return our request for comment.

The FBI, the DEA, the ATF, the Maryland State Police, the Maryland Transportation Authority Police and the local municipal departments of Aberdeen, Havre de Grace and Bel Air are all investigating the incident.

© 2018   Created by Steve - Ning Creator.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service