President Obama is preparing to unleash a wave of new regulations in 2016, as he looks to shore up his legacy on public protection issues during his final year in office. 

The Securities and Exchange Commission, the Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Labor are all expected to finalize major federal rules that critics say are long overdue. The regulations include a final rule from the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law that will force companies to compare the paychecks of their top executives with company performance, final rules for cigars and electronic cigarettes proposed well over a year ago and a final regulation to protect constructions workers from deadly silica dust. 

Here’s a look at the top regulations expected to come from the administration in 2016. 

Pay for Performance  

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is expected to finalized its “pay for performance” rule that will force publicly traded companies to disclose how much their top executives are making and compare those paychecks with overall company performance. 

The agency, which first proposed the rule in May, set an October 2016 deadline for the final rule in the semi-regulatory agenda last month. The SEC contends the rule will allow shareholders to make more informed decisions when electing directors.

Arbitration 

Regulatory experts are expecting the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) to propose new rules in 2016 to protect consumers’ right to file or join a class action lawsuit against a financial company. 

More and more companies are adding arbitration clauses to contracts that prevent a consumer from resolving a dispute through the court system. Instead, the language, which can often be found in credit card and cell phone contracts, typically states that disputes about a product can only be resolved by privately appointed individuals or arbitrators.

Dodd-Frank directed CFPB to do a study of arbitration agreements and issue a report of its findings to congress. After the agency completed the report in March, it announced plans to proceed with a rulemaking. 

E-cigarettes 

Industry and health groups may not agree on the rules, but both are exasperated by the delay in first-ever regulations from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cigars and electronic cigarettes.

Health groups were frantic in the days leading up to the release of the $1.1 trillion government spending deal, fearing that industry had successfully lobbied for a change that would have exempted a many e-cigarette and cigar products from the restrictions. 

Industry groups, however, came up empty-handed and will now wait to see if attempts to lobby the White House for last minute changes paid off. Industry groups are most concerned about a provision in the proposed rule that would require all products that hit store shelves after Feb. 15, 2007 to apply retroactively for approval, a process that companies say would put them out of business.

FDA originally said the final rules would be out last summer then changed the deadline to November. The White House Office of Management and Budget, which is reviewing the final rule, was still meeting with industry and health groups last week. 

read more:

http://thehill.com/regulation/263794-wave-of-regulations-looms-in-2016

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Obama can go fly a kite.

Or a broom, all the way into the sun.

All cigarettes and tobacco can be done away with for my part.I donot allow people to smoke in my home,auto,are anywhere on my property.I have been tobacco and nicotine free for 15 years now and I was a two pack aday.I started smoking when I was twelve years old.I have dipped,chewed,and smoked and now I don't.Thanks be unto God for my deliverance.

 

Amen to that. I've been smoke free for 12 years myself. Gotta love!

I owe my quitting to Walmart .my dr. had just told me that he was going to put a hook in my back to hang the oxygen tank on so that i could breathe if I did not quit. I went out side and as with all heavy smokers I lit up. finished and lit another half way through i had a color vision of being in Walmart and was looking at a lady in a blue and white kingom dress on a electric cart and was hanging over both sides by at least a foot. she had a large oxygen tank on her back and a mask . she was pulling the mask to one side and sucking on a large cigarette. I immediately put that last cigaret down and have not smoked another since. that was eight years ago. SO , Thank you Walmart

Oh yes I don't drink either nor allow someone who does around me when they are.

That's great!  

I don't think the govt. has the right to MAKE people quit smoking..or anything else.  

Hey....no problem. The GOP will always be ready for their usual fierce push back....Right?

....which is usually ZERO.

Just like Communists, they are driven to tell everyone how, what, when and where to do any and everything.

This POS can take his regulations and shove them up his monkey ass! Time to put a human back in the W.H.

Extraordinary action is going to be required by We the People or this country is gone.  Look to 1775.............hard choices had to be made, great risks and brave sacrifices were made as well.  To stand by and do nothing insures defeat and the loss of everything we hold dear.  We are under deadly attack from inside our own government structure and the chips are down.  i am afraid the ball is in our court.

Them DO something

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ALERT ALERT

Joe Biden Talks To The Dead: – He Worked On Paris Climate Deal With Long-Dead Chinese Leader

Former Vice President Joe Biden mistakenly claimed on Monday that he worked on the Paris Climate Accord with former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping — who died more than 20 years before its signing.

Zach Parkinson  

Joe Biden claimed tonight that he worked with Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping on the Paris Climate Accord.

Except the current Chinese President is Xi Jinping.

Deng Xiapoing left office in 1992 and has been dead for 23 years.

Biden made the gaffe while citing his accomplishments in President Barack Obama’s administration.

“One of the things I’m proudest of is getting passed, getting moved, getting in control of the Paris Climate Accord,” Biden said in a speech at the College of Charleston. “I’m the guy who came back after meeting with Deng Xiaoping and making the case that I believe China will join if we put pressure on them. We got almost 200 nations to join.”

Xiaoping served as the leader of China from 1978 until his retirement in 1992, and passed away in 1997. Xi Jinping, China’s current president, came to power 2013 and signed the country onto the 2016 agreement.

In June 2017, President Trump announced that the U.S. would withdraw from the agreement, stating that accord will “undermine the economy” and “puts [the United States] at a permanent disadvantage.”

In addition to the Xiaoping gaffe, Biden bizarrely declared in a campaign speech that he is a “candidate for the United States Senate” and that people could “vote for the other Biden” if they prefer one of his rivals.

“My name is Joe Biden. I’m a Democratic candidate for the United States Senate. Look me over, if you like what you see, help out. If not, vote for the other Biden,” the 77-year-old said at the First in the South Dinner.

Biden’s confusing comments come as Democrat primary candidates are scheduled to debate in Charleston Tuesday evening. The former vice president faces increasing pressure to give a standout performance as his “firewall” in the Palmetto State crumbles in the face of a surging Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT). The Vermont senator is fresh off a decisive victory in Nevada caucuses on Saturday. Earlier this month, he placed first the New Hampshire primary and won the popular vote in Iowa. In a survey released Monday, the Public Policy Polling outfit said Biden leads South Carolina with 36 percent of support and Sanders is in second at 21 percent.

Hannity: Bernie's beyond gross article

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