Mueller Facing Jail Time After Conflict Of Interest Derails Russia Investigation


After more than a year of investigations into President Trump and Russia, special counsel Robert Mueller is facing a conflict of interest that could derail the investigation and open himself to prosecution.

 This would be cool, if it happens? Special counsel Robert Mueller’s phony investigation into President Trump and Russia is collapsing like a house of cards after more than one year and absolutely no evidence found that implicates the president with anything remotely criminal. 

However, after more than a year of investigation into President Donald Trump, a Russian connection to the case has finally been found. But there is a reason that you have not seen this revelation around the clock on mainstream media networks.

That’s because the Russian connections lead directly back to special counsel Robert Mueller himself. Those who recognized Mueller as a swamp creature were right all along.

A report released Monday by The Hill outlined an operation conducted by the FBI in 2009 when Mueller was the director. It now has him in this conflict of interest that could destroy his entire investigation into President Trump.

“In 2009, when Mueller ran the FBI, the bureau asked Russian oligarch Oleg Deripaska to spend millions of his own dollars funding an FBI-supervised operation to rescue a retired FBI agent, Robert Levinson, captured in Iran while working for the CIA in 2007,” The Hill wrote.

“Yes, that’s the same Deripaska who has surfaced in Mueller’s current investigation and who was recently sanctioned by the Trump administration,” author John Solomon said. “The Levinson mission is confirmed by more than a dozen participants inside and outside the FBI, including Deripaska, his lawyer, the Levinson family and a retired agent who supervised the case. Mueller was kept apprised of the operation, officials told me.”

Not only did more than a dozen people connected to the operation confirm its existence, they also told The Hill that Mueller was kept abreast of the operation every step of the way. Mueller convinced the Russian billionaire to help finance the operation in 2009, the sources said.

“We knew he was paying for his team helping us, and that probably ran into the millions,” an official who was involved in the operation told The Hill.

“One agent who helped court Deripaska was Andrew McCabe, the recently fired FBI deputy director who played a seminal role starting the Trump-Russia case, multiple sources confirmed,” The Hill reported.

MW reports: An attorney for Deripaska also confirmed his client’s role in the operation and his relationship with Mueller. The billionaire spent $25 million to help assemble a team to rescue Levinson from Iran before Hillary Clinton, who was serving as Secretary of State, nixed the deal.

“Deripaska’s efforts came very close to success,” David McGee, a former federal prosecutor who represents Levinson’s family, told The Hill. “We were told at one point that the terms of Levinson’s release had been agreed to by Iran and the U.S. and included a statement by then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton pointing a finger away from Iran. At the last minute, Secretary Clinton decided not to make the agreed-on statement.”

Levinson is still missing, and his family continues to worry about his safety because Clinton decided not to seal the deal that would have facilitated his return to his family.

“We tried to turn over every stone we could to rescue Bob, but every time we started to get close, the State Department seemed to always get in the way,” Robyn Gritz, a retired agent who supervised the Levinson case said. “I kept Director Mueller and Deputy Director [John] Pistole informed of the various efforts and operations, and they offered to intervene with State, if necessary.”

But things get tricky for Mueller with his indictment of former campaign manager for President Trump, Paul Manafort.

“Mueller’s indictment of Manafort makes no mention of Deripaska, even though prosecutors have evidence that Manafort contemplated inviting his old Russian client for a 2016 Trump campaign briefing,” according to The Hill. “The U.S. government in April imposed sanctions on Deripaska, one of several prominent Russians targeted to punish Vladimir Putin — using the same sort of allegations that State used from 2006 to 2009. Yet, between those two episodes, Deripaska seemed good enough for the FBI to ask him to fund that multimillion-dollar rescue mission and to allow him into the country eight times.”

Why did Mueller leave Deripaska out of the indictment? Was it because he knew that his connection to the Russian billionaire, who just had sanctions against him imposed by the United States government, would have been revealed?

“The real question becomes whether it was proper to leave [Deripaska] out of the Manafort indictment and whether that omission was to avoid the kind of transparency that is really required by the law,” Alan Dershowitz told The Hill.

“It’s possible the bureau’s arrangement with Mr. Deripaska violated the Antideficiency Act, which prohibits the government from accepting voluntary services,” Clinton Justice Department lawyer Melanie Sloan said.

After all this time, it could be Robert Mueller who broke the law. Is this enough to end the investigation, and could it even be enough to prosecute Mueller?

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LIGHTER SIDE

 

Political Cartoons by Tom Stiglich

ALERT ALERT

 Judge Orders Mueller To Prove  Russia Meddled In Election 

Judge Dabney L. Friedrich

A Washington federal judge on Thursday ordered special counsel Robert Mueller’s team to clarify election meddling claims lodged against a Russian company operated by Yevgeny Prigozhin, an ally of Russian President Vladimir Putin, according to Bloomberg.

Concord Management and Consulting, LLC. – one of three businesses indicted by Mueller in February along with 13 individuals for election meddling, surprised the special counsel in April when they actually showed up in court to fight the charges. Mueller’s team tried to delay Concord from entering the case, arguing that thee Russian company not been properly served, however Judge Dabney Friedrich denied the request – effectively telling prosecutors ‘well, they’re here.’

Concord was accused in the indictment of supporting the Internet Research Agency (IRA), a Russian ‘troll farm’ accused of trying to influence the 2016 US election.

On Thursday, Judge Freidrich asked Mueller’s prosecutors if she should assume they aren’t accusing Concord of violating US laws applicable to election expenditures and failure to register as a foreign agent.

Concord has asked Dabney to throw out the charges – claiming that Mueller’s office fabricated a crime, and that there is no law against interfering in elections.

According to the judge’s request for clarification, the Justice Department has argued that it doesn’t have to show that Concord had a legal duty to report its expenditures to the Federal Election Commission. Rather, the allegation is that the company knowingly engaged in deceptive acts that precluded the FEC, or the Justice Department, from ascertaining whether they had broken the law. -Bloomberg

On Monday, Friedrich raised questions over whether the special counsel’s office could prove a key element of their case – saying that it was “hard to see” how allegations of Russian influence were intended to interfere with US government operations vs. simply “confusing voters,” reports law.com.

During a 90-minute hearing, Friedrich questioned prosecutor Jonathan Kravis about how the government would be able to show the Russian defendants were aware of the Justice Department and FEC’s functions and then deliberately sought to skirt them.

“You still have to show knowledge of the agencies and what they do. How do you do that?” Friedrich asked.

Kravis, a prosecutor in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia, argued that the government needed only to show that Concord Management and the other defendants were generally aware that the U.S. government “regulates and monitors” foreign participation in American politics. That awareness, Kravis said, could be inferred from the Russians’ alleged creation of fake social media accounts that appeared to be run by U.S. citizens and “computer infrastructure” intended to mask the Russian origin of the influence operation.

“That is deception that is directed at a higher level,” Kravis said. Kravis appeared in court with Michael Dreeben, a top Justice Department appellate lawyer on detail to the special counsel’s office. -law.com

Concord pleaded not guilty in May. Their attorney, Eric Dubelier – a partner at Reed Smith, has described the election meddling charges as “make believe,” arguing on Monday that Mueller’s indictment against Concord “doesn’t charge a crime.”

“There is no statute of interfering with an election. There just isn’t,” said Dubelier, who added that Mueller’s office alleged a “made-up crime to fit the facts they have.”

Dubelier added that the case against Concord Management is the first in US history “where anyone has ever been charged with defrauding the Justice Department” through their failure to register under FARA.

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