Fayaz Nawabi has never met President Trump. But he credits the president with convincing him to run for office.

Nawabi, a 31-year-old candidate for San Diego City Council, supports almost everything that Trump opposes: He is pro-affordable housing, pro-environment, pro-immigrant and pro-refugee. That makes him part of the blue wave of new liberal candidates spurred to run by Trump’s election and policies.

 But Nawabi is also part of a notable subset: the blue Muslim wave.

 More than 90 American Muslims, nearly all of them Democrats, are running for public office across the country this year. Many are young and politically inexperienced, and most are long shots. But they represent a collective gamble: that voters are so disgusted by America’s least popular president on record that they’re willing to elect members of America’s least popular religious minority group.

Although their number seems small, the candidacies mark an unprecedented rise for the nation’s diverse Muslim community that typically has been underrepresented in American politics.

There are more than 3.3 million Muslims living in the United States, but Muslim Americans hold just two of the 535 seats in Congress. And the Muslim community’s voter participation pales in comparison to the general public’s.

The rise of Muslim candidates coincides with the growth of the predominantly immigrant population and a partisan shift that has played out over a generation. In a 2001 Zogby poll of American Muslims, 42 percent said they voted for Republican George W. Bush in the previous year’s presidential election, while 31 percent said they voted for Democrat Al Gore. By last year, just 8 percent of voting American Muslims in a Pew poll said they voted for Trump, while 78 percent said they voted for Democrat Hillary Clinton.


Fayaz Nawabi, a Muslim candidate running for San Diego City Council, gathers his belongings before going to a debate at the Mira Mesa Public Library in San Diego on March 3. (Sandy Huffaker/For The Washington Post)

While Clinton’s campaign never garnered broad enthusiasm from Muslim communities, Trump’s campaign — which called for the monitoring of mosques and a ban on Muslims entering the United States — delivered a jolt on election night that some American Muslims likened to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

“It woke everyone up,” Nawabi said.

Now, Muslim candidates are running for a wide range of offices across the country, from local school boards to the U.S. Senate. Some are making their Muslim identity central to their campaigns.

“When you put someone in a corner and they’re in survival mode, they have a tendency to come out and speak more prominently about their beliefs,” said Nawabi, who considers himself an “unapologetic Muslim” who can quote the Koran from memory and moonlights as a “freelance imam.”

In Michigan, where 13 Muslim candidates are running for office, physician Abdul El-Sayed is hoping voters will elect him to be the first Muslim governor in the United States and has used his religion in campaign ads against Republican front-runner Bill Schuette, whom Trump has endorsed.

“Donald Trump and Steve Bannon would love to see a right-wing radical like Bill Schuette elected in Michigan,” reads a Facebook ad for El-Sayed, who faces a Democratic primary in August. “You know what would be sweet justice? If we elected a 33-year-old Muslim instead of Bill Schuette. Send a message and help elect the first Muslim governor in America.”

A new generation of leaders

A half a century ago, a small population of black Americans embraced Islam as a pathway to political empowerment and civil rights, and today their descendants are members of the U.S. military, police officers, city council members and career civil servants.

But in the immigrant community, the experience is newer. About two-thirds of American Muslims are immigrants or the children of immigrants, and activists say a cultural fear or mistrust of government can accompany those who have fled authoritarian regimes, hindering participation in the political process.

“A lot of people feel like, ‘I’m just going to make my money, put my head down,’” said Nawabi, whose family arrived in San Diego as refugees from Afghanistan when he was a toddler.

They feel political involvement “puts a target on their backs because that’s what it meant where they came from,” he said.


Fayaz Nawabi, a Muslim candidate running for San Diego City Council, leads morning prayers at the Muslim Community Center on March 3. (Sandy Huffaker/For The Washington Post)

A small number of Muslim and Arab advocacy groups, such as e the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), Emgage (formerly called Emerge USA), and the Arab American Institute have spent years training young political activists, tracking rising politicians and running get-out-the-vote campaigns, particularly in immigrant communities after the 9/11 terrorist attacks set off an anti-Muslim and anti-Arab backlash.

But Trump’s policies have intensified the push for political activism in the diverse community. There was the travel ban, which sought to prohibit entry to people from several Muslim-majority countries, as well as refugees. There were Trump’s calls to monitor mosques and his appointments of Cabinet members and political advisers who have disparaged and mocked Muslims. There were the comments and tweets that cast Islam as inherently dangerous and called Muslim patriotism into question.

Emgage, a nonprofit organization geared toward promoting Muslim political engagement, polled registered Muslim voters after the 2016 presidential election and found that 53 percent felt “less safe.”

“But the response has been increased civic participation,” said Wa’el Alzayat, the organization’s chief executive. “I’m one of the people who, looking at the long-term impact of this, is optimistic.”

A sizable generation of American-born Muslims and Arabs are in their 20s and 30s, their school years shaped by 9/11, and their comfort and familiarity in the American political system far surpassing that of their immigrant parents.

“They’re ready,” said James Zogby, a longtime Democratic operative and president of the Arab American Institute, who has provided funding and mentorship to several candidates. “Both communities separately have reached a level of maturation.”

Nawabi, a self-described “typical millennial” and avid surfer, was never interested in politics until Sen. Bernie Sanders (Vt.) captured his attention during the 2016 presidential race. But it was the day after Trump won the election that Nawabi decided he needed to act.

That morning, he walked into the local Islamic school where he was then teaching, imagining how his students’ parents might be “trying to explain to their kids that there’s a bigot, a racist, in the White House.”

But when he got to the classroom, he realized his second-graders were already thinking about it.

“They were talking about where they were going to move now that Trump was president,” said Nawabi. “That really affected me.”

Before long, he had become an assembly district delegate for the California Democratic Party, a win he attributed to his ability to mobilize 200 Muslim voters. He gave sermons at mosques attended by mostly immigrants about the importance of seeing themselves as part of the American political system, and he launched a Muslim American Democratic Club in San Diego.

“The Republican Party has completely thrown our community under the bus,” he said.

He added his name to the ballot for city council.


Fayaz Nawabi, a muslim candidate running for San Diego City Council, interacts with people at his campaign booth outside of the Mira Mesa Library on March 3. (Sandy Huffaker/For The Washington Post)
A flurry of firsts

The call to action among American Muslims has yielded a diverse array of candidates. They include former Obama administration officials and longtime political activists, but also physicians and lawyers, women’s rights advocates, a molecular biologist and a former Planned Parenthood manager.

The flurry of candidacies makes for a lot of potential “firsts.”

Asif Mahmood, a 56-year-old pulmonologist, would be the first Muslim insurance commissioner in California. Deedra Abboud, 45, in Arizona, or Jesse Sbaih, 42, in Nevada, could be the country’s first Muslim senator.

And any one of four Muslim women — Nadia Hashimi, 40, in Maryland; Sameena Mustafa, 47, in Illinois; or Fayrouz Saad, 34, and Rashida Tlaib, 41, in Michigan — could be the first in Congress.

Muslim political activists and community leaders say they’ve noticed more young Muslims showing up to political events ranging from legislative hearings and school board meetings to women’s marches and civil rights rallies.

“I think you see this invigoration of the younger generation who is like, ‘We need to stand up and share our narratives and share our stories. We can’t stand on the sidelines,’ ” said Abdullah Hammoud, 27, who won election to Michigan’s state legislature in 2016. “There is this fire lit under them. They see their rights being stripped away, day in and day out.”

Several also have dealt with backlash. “Sorry no room for Muslims in our government,” one man wrote last year on Abboud’s campaign Facebook page. Kia Hamadanchy, the 32-year-old son of Iranian immigrants who is running for Congress in Southern California, said he occasionally has to delete online comments, including one that said, “He wants to behead you all.”

Nawabi says a few people have asked him why he has a beard, whether he speaks English and even whether he’s a terrorist.

Still, many Muslim candidates are wearing their religion as a badge of honor.

“As a Muslim immigrant from the great blue state of California, I’m a triple threat to Donald Trump!” Mahmood posted on his campaign website.

“The child of Palestinian immigrants . . . the first female Muslim elected to the Michigan Legislature,” Rashida Tlaib, running for Congress, wrote on hers.

Some candidates and political activists say that even if no Muslim candidate wins a seat this year, the blue Muslim wave still will have accomplished something. The American public will grow more accustomed to seeing Muslim candidates, they say, and Muslim youth will see candidates who look like them or share their values.

Many, they hope, will be inspired.

Under Trump, Zogby said, “Running itself becomes making a statement.”

Jorge Ribas in San Diego contributed to this report.

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This is terrifying. In charge of our laws and our "representation." not good in any way, shape or form.

Jean,

 We are building a list of names, and we found out that the Democrat Party is pushing this, along with some Republicans.

keep us updated

Hey Jean check out the link Tif shared for you, if you have not seen it yet: http://teapartyorg.ning.com/forum/topics/southern-poverty-law-cente...

Yes I saw it. 

Michigan, where 13 Muslim candidates are running for office
Abdul El-Sayed for Governor

Fayrouz Saad running. And she was a former Obama administration official from Homeland Security.


Attorney Tahirah Amatul-Wadud who is challenging incumbent U.S. Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass.

In Rochester, Minnesota, mayoral candidate Regina Mustafa

in Arizona, U.S. Senate candidate Deedra Abboud

Among the candidates to fall short were California physician Asif Mahmood,

And in Texas, wealthy businessman Tahir Javed

In Minnesota, the decision by Keith Ellison, the nation’s first Muslim congressman, to run for state attorney general has set off a political frenzy for his congressional seat that includes two Muslim candidates, both Democrats: Ilhan Omar, the country’s first Somali-American state lawmaker, and Jamal Abdulahi, a Somali-American activist.

There, former state Rep. Rashida Tlaib has raised more money than her Democratic rivals in the race to succeed Democratic Rep. John Conyers

Fayrouz Saad is also running as a Democrat in the wide open race to succeed Republican Rep. David Trott

In San Diego, California, 36-year-old Republican congressional candidate Omar Qudrat

We will try to find out who the rest are.
If they do take over Congress, they will tear down Trump's Wall,for open Borders and start teaching Islam in American schools, and if we do not like it, then thee is all ways another way to handle the issue.

Hank

Jet-pack trains muslims to run for office. 

https://www.jet-pac.com/

OUR MISSION

Jetpac (Justice Education Technology Political Advocacy Center) seeks to build a strong American Muslim political infrastructure and increase our community’s influence and engagement.

We will take our place at the table across all levels of government.

Our philosophy of change is rooted in a community-based approach, grassroots mobilization, civics training, and technology application. We have developed our own training curriculum, as well as proprietary social media technology and automation tools, to give our Fellows the skills and resources they need to win elections.

founded by  Nadeem Mazen, Shaum Kennedy, Suzan El-Rayess, Molly LaFlesh, Lizzie Devane.

Nadeem Mazen

President, Co-Founder, and Massachusetts’ first Muslim elected official at the City Council level, Nadeem started Jetpac to provide training and resources for American Muslim political organizers and allies, so they too can represent and serve their communities.

Jummah with Jetpac

We are excited to announce a new “Jummah with Jetpac” campaign! Starting this fall, the Jetpac team plans to visit 44 jummahs across Massachusetts, meeting new members of the community and spreading our mission to advance American Muslim leadership and engagement with political advocacy.

Boston’s Omar Khoshafa is one of the many American Muslims we have watched grow and harness their own civic leadership. Formerly a Harvard Presidential Fellow at Jetpac, Omar is now working at Boston City Hall in the Mayor’s office, and he still takes time to help with Jetpac initiatives.

Thank you Ms. Jean, I did visit the site twice.

 This site has a script error, one moment my comment was there. The next, it was gone.

 This looks more like what happened in England where Muslims now rule the British Political Court.

I smell a conspiracy, building, I am willing to bet there is more them just 90 people from Islam running for office in the USA.

 and here is the list of 22 to 25 people we know of that hold political positions in America.

OK, Tif they lied again, there is more people who are Muslim that hold seats of office, then just 3 people. Elected Muslim Politicians–Federal, State and Local Levels

 OK, Tif they lied again, there is more people who are Muslim that hold seats of office, then just 3 people.

 Elected Muslim Politicians–Federal, State and Local Levels

Keith Ellison D-MN-5
Andre Carson D-IN-7

Larry Shaw is a U.S. Democratic member of the North Carolina

Saqib Ali, Maryland House of Delegates

Saghir “Saggy” Tahir, New Hampshire Assembly

Rashida Tlaib, Michigan State Rep-Elect

Ako Abdul Samad, Iowa State Rep.

Jamilah Nasheed, Missouri Rep.

Talibdin El-Amin, Missouri Rep. District 57, Democrat

Rodney R. Hubbard, MO State Rep. District 58, Democrat

Yusuf Salam, Alabama Assembly 67th District—Democrat

Nasim Ansari, MI, Kalamazo County Commissioner 9th district

Judge David Shaheed,

Marion County Court
B.S., University of Evansville, 1976
J.D., Indiana University, 1984
Supervising Judge: Drug Treatment Court 2007
From: http://www.indy.gov/eGov/Courts/Superior/CourtInfo/Judges/shaheed.htm

Muhammad Khairullah, Mayor, Prospect Park, NJ

Wayne Smith Mayor, Irvington, NJ

Aslon Goow Sr., Councilman, Patterson, NJ

Mayor Abdul “Al” Haidous, Wayne, MI

Trustee Syed Taj, Canton Township, Democrat

Councilman Hassan Fahmy

City Councilman Shahab Ahmed

City Councilman Abdul Algazali

There are more and I will find them, the network files only had 3 people listed the files will be updated.

RSS

LIGHTER SIDE

 

Political Cartoons by AF BrancoPolitical Cartoons by Tom Stiglich

ALERT ALERT

TOTAL BULLSHIT!: Trump Goes Off On Mueller Report, People Who ‘Take So-Called Notes'

After a 22-month investigation — with 2,800 subpoenas, 500 witnesses and 500 search warrants, which generated thousands of pages of information, all costing upwards of $30 million — the media boiled it all down to two words: “I’m fucked.”

The media, toeing the line for Hillary Clinton — who, after her shocking and humiliating loss decided that she needed someone or something to blame and pointed a crooked finger at Russia — decided that President Trump all but admitted his alleged crimes with those two words.

In his report revealed on Thursday, Robert Mueller described a scene in the Oval Office that allegedly took place right after he was appointed special counsel and charged with investigating allegations that Trump or his campaign minions colluded with Russia to alter the outcome of the 2020 election.

“Oh my God,” the president told then Attorney General Jeff Sessions, according to the report. “This is terrible. This is the end of my Presidency. I’m fucked.” The interaction was recorded in notes taken by Session’s chief of staff, Jody Hunt.

Many media outlets did not include the context, which was plainly spoken by Trump at the same time. “Everyone tells me if you get one of these independent counsels it ruins your presidency,” Trump said. “It takes years and years and I won’t be able to do anything. This is the worst thing that ever happened to me.”

Luckily for America, he has been able to work through it all, returning the economy to its past glory, achieving record lows in unemployment, and much more.

Now, Trump is taking aim at “people that take so-called ‘notes.’ “

“Statements are made about me by certain people in the Crazy Mueller Report, in itself written by 18 Angry Democrat Trump Haters, which are fabricated & totally untrue. Watch out for people that take so-called ‘notes, when the notes never existed until needed. Because I never….” Trump wrote Friday morning on Twitter.

Donald J. Trump    realDonaldTrump

Statements are made about me by certain people in the Crazy Mueller Report, in itself written by 18 Angry Democrat Trump Haters, which are fabricated & totally untrue. Watch out for people that take so-called “notes,” when the notes never existed until needed. Because I never....

Trump got worked up after that, calling some tales told in the report “total bullshit.”

“[I]t was not necessary for me to respond to statements made in the ‘Report’ about me, some of which are total bullshit & only given to make the other person look good (or me to look bad). This was an Illegally Started Hoax that never should have happened,” he wrote.

Donald J. Trump   realDonaldTrump

Late Thursday night, Trump also praised Wall Street Journal opinion writer Kimberley Strassel, saying she “should get the Pulitzer. She is a treasure (and I don’t know her) who correctly called the Russia Hoax right from the start! Others who were soooo wrong will get the Prize. Fake News!”

Donald J. Trump    realDonaldTrump

Kimberley Strassel should get the Pulitzer. She is a treasure (and I don’t know her) who correctly called the Russia Hoax right from the start! Others who were soooo wrong will get the Prize. Fake News!

Kimberley Strassel    @KimStrassel

Jump to "where the Mueller team lists its 'prosecution and declination' decisions . . . try not to picture Mueller 'pit bull' prosecutor Andrew Weissmann collapsed under mountains of federal statutes after his two-year hunt to find one that applied."

In a tweet on Thursday, Strassel perfectly summed up the contents of the Mueller report.

“1) What is in the Mueller report: –endless, unrevealing details of inconsequential interaction between trump folks and Russians. –remarkable details about the many and varied statutes the SC [special counsel] nonetheless debated using to tie someone up for something on the Russia front,” she wrote.

Kimberley Strassel    @KimStrassel

1) What is in the Mueller report:
--endless, unrevealing details of inconsequential interaction between trump folks and Russians.
--remarkable details about the many and varied statutes the SC nonetheless debated using to tie someone up for something on the Russia front

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