Judge Rules Obama EPA Knew Flint Residents Were at Risk for Lead Poisoning


Judge rules Obama's EPA knew about potential lead poisoning in Flint but failed to inform residents

 A federal judge ruled Thursday that Flint residents can move forward with lawsuits targeting the EPA’s handling of the Michigan city’s lead contamination fisasco.

 From Daily Caller: The EPA under former President Barack Obama was too slow to intervene in the case, according to U.S. Judge Linda Parker, who ruled that the federal government was not immune from legal action in the case. More than a dozen lawsuits were filed against Michigan and city officials after researchers discovered in 2016 that Flint’s water contained elevated levels of lead in 2014 and 2015.

“The impact on the health of the nearly 100,000 residents of the City of Flint remains untold,” Parker wrote in her opinion. “It is anticipated, however, that the injury caused by the lead-contaminated public water supply system will affect the residents for years and likely generations to come.”

 The EPA knew Flint officials “were not warning Flint’s residents that they were being supplied lead-laced water. Quite to the contrary, the EPA learned that State and local officials were misleading residents to believe that there was nothing wrong with the water supply,” the judge added.

 Fifteen state and local officials have been criminally indicted in connection with what many in the media have dubbed a water crisis. Four of the officials were charged with involuntary manslaughter. Much of the controversy happened after Flint switched its water source to the Flint River in 2014 without adding anti-corrosive agents to the water. Lead levels in drinking water supplies increased shortly thereafter.

 Experts are worried the media are getting too far ahead of themselves. The numbers are “being horribly exaggerated,” Hernan Gomez, an associate professor at the University of Michigan and medical toxicologist at Hurley Medical Center, told The Daily Caller News Foundation in September 2018.

 Blood lead levels (BLLs) are no higher in Flint than in other cities across Michigan, said Gomez, who noted that there is no acceptable level of lead in drinking water even if there is a level that is considered tolerable.

 The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers a BLL in children of 5 micrograms per deciliter (µg/dL) and higher to be a “reference level.” The annual percentage of Flint children whose BLLs rose above the reference level increased from 2.2 percent to 3.7 percent, a relatively small uptick given actual lead levels, Gomez noted in a 2018 research paper.

 These numbers are small relative to previous decades, with the average toddler in the 1970s holding a BLL of 14 µg/dL, a number three times higher than the reference level. Those numbers fell to 0.84 µg/dL by 2014 following a government ban on lead in paint and gasoline in 1971. Children with blood lead levels of 5 µg/dL or higher dropped in Flint from 11.8 percent in 2006 to 3.2 percent in 2016.

CDC recommends treatment for people with BLLs at or above 45 µg/dL.

The EPA has not yet responded to TheDNCF’s request for comment.

https://newspunch.com/judge-rules-obama-epa-knew-flint-residents-le...

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Another 20 spot he will not go to jail...:)-

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ALERT ALERT

SICK: Leprosy On The Rise In Los Angeles 

Ahh, the joys of open borders and Democrat leadership.

California is not just a public toilet but now there is evidence that leprosy is on the rise in Los Angeles County.

Barack Obama changed US law in 2016 and allowed immigrants with blistering STDs and leprosy to migrate to the US.

Medscape reported:

Leprosy, also known as Hansen’s disease, is rarely seen in the United States, but cases continue to emerge in Los Angeles County, a new report says.

“Hansen’s disease still exists, and we need to educate medical students and physicians,” coauthor Dr. Maria Teresa Ochoa from Keck Medical Center of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, told Reuters Health by email.

Dr. Ochoa and colleagues identified 187 patients with the disease in a review of medical records from their leprosy clinic spanning 1973 to 2018. Most patients were Latino, originating from Mexico, and they experienced a median delay in diagnosis of more than three years, the team reports JAMA Dermatology, online August 7.

Multibacillary leprosy (MB) cases outnumbered paucibacillary leprosy (PB) cases by nearly eight to one (88.6% vs. 11.4%, respectively), and Latino patients were more likely than non-Latino patients to have MB, as were patients from Central or South America (versus other regions).

Most patients (80.7%) received multidrug therapy, and most (92.6%) received antibiotics for more than two years, especially if they had MB.

Only about half of patients (56.7%) had World Health Organization (WHO) grade 0 disability (no signs or symptoms suggestive of leprosy or disability) at the one-year follow-up, whereas 16.0% had grade 1 disability (loss of protective sensation) and 26.2% had grade 2 disability (visible deformity) at the last follow-up.

Among the patients who lost protective sensation, 87.7% (50/57) did not regain it following therapy.

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