In bad taste: 9/11 museum opening Danny Meyer restaurant

The 9/11 museum’s appetite for crass commercialism will be satisfied with an 80-seat restaurant inside the memorial’s allegedly solemn grounds.

The Pavilion Cafe, run by Danny Meyer’s Union Square Events, is scheduled to open this summer inside the National September 11 Memorial & Museum — a move overlooked when museum officials took media and VIPs through the grounds last week.

The menu is expected to offer “an array of local, seasonal fare in a relaxing and comfortable environment,” according a notice in the official museum guide.

“We’re not doing this for crass or commercial reasons,” said Meyer, adding that a portion of proceeds are going back to the museum.

A rep for Union Square Events added: “We’re just trying to create a thoughtful experience and bring our hospitality [to the museum and visitors].”

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The museum’s struggle with good taste was on display Tuesday night, as VIPs partied on the sacred grounds while first responders and family members of victims were turned away at the door, sources told The Post.

Before the 9/11 museum was opened to the general public on Wednesday morning, first responders and family had been been allowed inside for advance looks since last Thursday night.

But those honored visitors were turned away at the door early Tuesday evening, because only VIPs — who included former Mayor Michael Bloomberg — were allowed inside for a black-tie cocktail reception, sources said.

“To have a festive occasion on human remains, it’s repulsive, it’s repugnant,” said construction worker John Feal, a Ground Zero volunteer and activist for 9/11 first 

responders.

Feal said Tuesday’s closed-door, catered event could have been held at any number of spaces in the neighborhood.

“I understand the need to raise money to operate a museum,” Feal said. “But when you’re disrespecting 9/11 victims, you’ve crossed the line of being humane.”

The museum cut off the first responder and family visits Tuesday night to get ready for the general-public opening on Wednesday, according to a museum spokesman.

But the rep also confirmed that the soiree — with about 50 to 60 guests — went on, even during preparations.

“The days-long preview included 24-hour operations over that period. We had to close the museum to prepare the space for our historic public opening [Wednesday],” said museum spokesman Michael Frazier.

Read more at:  http://nypost.com/2014/05/21/in-bad-taste-911-memorial-museum-openi...

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@Al Pambuena,

You raise a good point here.  If this site were designated only as a Memorial Site rather than a museum, there would by no eatery or gift shop directly inside.  But it is designated as both a museum and a memorial site.

NYC has many museums both great and small.  Most of the larger museums have restaurants and gift shops. I am sure there are enough Americans who would have supported it's upkeep to avoid having to place a restaurant and gift shop directly inside.  I have less of a problem with the restaurant than the gift shop which is crass to say the least.

Before 9-11-2001, the Twin Towers weren't profitable for its owner, Larry Silverstein. (A popular "conspiracy theory" is that this is what prompted Silverstein to demolish his own towers, with the help of outside forces, so that he could collect the insurance money). Not sure what to make of this theory. But it looks like the new owners want to make it as profitable as possible this time around. Crass, but profitable.

What next a floating restaurant next to the USS Arizona ! Whats wrong with these people ( Dems)? 

This has become Disneyland at Ground Zero. What next a theme park at Gettysburg!

   Its like selling tissue's at a funeral.

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