821 million people now hungry and over 150 million children stunted, putting hunger eradication goal at risk

11 September 2018 

New evidence continues to signal that the number of hungry people in the world is growing, reaching 821 million in 2017 or one in every nine people, according to The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World 2018 released today. Limited progress is also being made in addressing the multiple forms of malnutrition, ranging from child stunting to adult obesity, putting the health of hundreds of millions of people at risk.

Hunger has been on the rise over the past three years, returning to levels from a decade ago. This reversal in progress sends a clear warning that more must be done and urgently if the Sustainable Development Goal of Zero Hunger is to be achieved by 2030. 

The situation is worsening in South America and most regions of Africa, while the decreasing trend in undernourishment that characterized Asia seems to be slowing down significantly.

The annual UN report found that climate variability affecting rainfall patterns and agricultural seasons, and climate extremes such as droughts and floods, are among the key drivers behind the rise in hunger, together with conflict and economic slowdowns.

“The alarming signs of increasing food insecurity and high levels of different forms of malnutrition are a clear warning that there is considerable work to be done to make sure we ‘leave no one behind’ on the road towards achieving the SDG goals on food security and improved nutrition,” the heads of the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), the UN Children's Fund (UNICEF), the World Food Programme (WFP) and WHO warned in their joint foreword to the report. 

“If we are to achieve a world without hunger and malnutrition in all its forms by 2030, it is imperative that we accelerate and scale up actions to strengthen the resilience and adaptive capacity of food systems and people’s livelihoods in response to climate variability and extremes,” the leaders said.

 

The impact of climate variability and extremes on hunger 

Changes in climate are already undermining production of major crops such as wheat, rice and maize in tropical and temperate regions and, without building climate resilience, this is expected to worsen as temperatures increase and become more extreme.  

Analysis in the report shows that the prevalence and number of undernourished people tend to be higher in countries highly exposed to climate extremes. Undernourishment is higher again when exposure to climate extremes is compounded by a high proportion of the population depending on agricultural systems that are highly sensitive to rainfall and temperature variability.   

Temperature anomalies over agricultural cropping areas continued to be higher than the long-term mean throughout 2011–2016, leading to more frequent spells of extreme heat in the last five years. The nature of rainfall seasons is also changing, such as the late or early start of rainy seasons and the unequal distribution of rainfall within a season. 

The harm to agricultural production contributes to shortfalls in food availability, with knock-on effects causing food price hikes and income losses that reduce people’s access to food.  

 

Slow progress on ending all forms of malnutrition 

Poor progress has been made in reducing child stunting, the report says, with nearly 151 million children aged under 5 too short for their age due to malnutrition in 2017, compared to 165 million in 2012. Globally, Africa and Asia accounted for 39% and 55%  of all stunted children, respectively.

Prevalence of child wasting remains extremely high in Asia where almost 1 in 10 children under five has low weight for their height, compared to just one in 100 in Latin America and the Caribbean.

The report describes as “shameful” the fact that one in three women of reproductive age globally is affected by anaemia, which has significant health and development consequences for both women and their children. No region has shown a decline in anaemia among women of reproductive age, and the prevalence in Africa and Asia is nearly three times higher than in North America.

Rates of exclusive breastfeeding in Africa and Asia are 1.5 times higher than those in North America where only 26% of infants under 6 months receive breastmilk exclusively.

 

The other side of hunger: obesity on the rise 

Adult obesity is worsening, and more than one in eight adults in the world is obese. The problem is most significant in North America, but Africa and Asia are also experiencing an upward trend, the report shows.

Undernutrition and obesity coexist in many countries, and can even be seen side by side in the same household. Poor access to nutritious food due to its higher cost, the stress of living with food insecurity, and physiological adaptations to food deprivation help explain why food-insecure families may have a higher risk of overweight and obesity.

 

Call for action

The report calls for implementing and scaling up interventions aimed at guaranteeing access to nutritious foods and breaking the intergenerational cycle of malnutrition. Policies must pay special attention to groups who are the most vulnerable to the harmful consequences of poor food access: infants, children aged under five, school-aged children, adolescent girls, and women.

At the same time, a sustainable shift must be made towards nutrition-sensitive agriculture and food systems that can provide safe and high-quality food for all.

The report also calls for greater efforts to build climate resilience through policies that promote climate change adaptation and mitigation, and disaster risk reduction.  

 

Key facts and figures

  • Number of  hungry people in the world in 2017: 821 million or 1 in every 9 people
  • in Asia: 515 million
  • in Africa: 256.5 million
  • in Latin America and the Caribbean: 39 million
  • Children under 5 affected by stunting (low height-for-age): 150.8 million (22.2%)
  • Children under 5 affected by wasting (low weight-for-height): 50.5 million (7.5%)
  • Children under 5 who are overweight (high weight-for-height): 38.3 million (5.6%)
  • Percentage of women of reproductive age affected by anaemia: 32.8%
  • Percentage of infants aged below 6 months who were exclusively breastfed: 40.7%
  • Adults who are obese: 672 million (13% or 1 in 8 adults).

 

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 If they would stop piss*ing away money for wars and to build the NWO, there would be enough food to go around several times.

Well da. Lol.

Tell these idiots to stop having large families... if they are unable to feed them don't breed them.  True incidents of famine can be dealt with by the nations of the world... and charity... thru volunteer giving. 

However, there are hundreds of millions who are starving or malnourished due to overpopulation or the irresponsible sexual behavior of individuals unable to provide for their families and illegitimate children. 

The productive populations of the world should not be held eternally captive by the negligent acts of the poor and irresponsible cultures in the world.  Forcefully requiring the productive to give to the non-productive doesn't work.. never has... it is called socialism which breeds even more non-productive generations.

But Ronald, when Obama bomb the shi*t out of Syria with the British and Israel- they immigrated them to America, so go figure...:)

And they are all piss*ed of at Americans...:)

Most of the migrants went to North into Turkey with hundreds of thousands finding their way into Europe.  In contrast few made it to America... but one is one too many.

 Another BS report by Ronald, how many Syrian immigrated into America: https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-1-d&q=how+many+S...

Tif

You are obviously are math-challenged... 64K refugees in the US, out of the 5 million refugees who have left Syria... is an insignificant number... Less than 1.5% of the Syrian refugees have entered the US.  Wake up and get a real education.

External Refugees of the Syrian Civil War are estimated to be around 5 million (2016) by the United Nations.  They are located in national refugee camps established in Turkey (3,614,108), Lebanon (929,624), Jordan (662,010), Egypt (131,433), and other countries. (64,000) in the USA... an insignificant number out of the total.

See:
Refugees of the Syrian Civil War - Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Refugees_of_the_Syrian_Civil_War

I looked in on Tiffany's link, don't worry Nelson you may get over yourself someday☺☺☺

Rosie...

What are you talking about... Tif's post regarding the 64K Syrian refugees in the US only serves to demonstrate she has no sense of proportion... when analyzing the effects of international incidents or migration.

How many Syrian refugees did the US take in 2018?

In fiscal 2018, Trump's first full fiscal year in office, he set the nation's refugee ceiling at 45,000, a new low at the time, and the U.S. ultimately admitted about 22,500. Trump set the refugee ceiling at 30,000 for the current fiscal year, and as of Aug. 31 the U.S. had admitted about 28,100.

I believe the numbers you posted Henry are the TOTALS for ALL REFUGEES not just Syrian refugees.   I did not check to see how many Syrian refugees were admitted in those years you posted... I suspect they were only a portion of the total.

Here are some recent numbers for Refugees... note... none from Syrian.

Refugees from the Democratic Republic of Congo far outnumbered those from other countries in fiscal 2019. D.R. Congo accounted for nearly 13,000 refugees, followed by Burma (Myanmar) with about 4,900, then Ukraine (4,500), Eritrea (1,800) and Afghanistan (1,200). The picture looks different over the longer term. Since fiscal 2002 (Oct. 1, 2001, to Sept. 30, 2019), the most refugees have come from Burma (about 177,700), Iraq (144,400) and Somalia (104,100)]

See: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2019/10/07/key-facts-about-re...

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ALERT ALERT

Obama Lies Again: – Ignores That The Year After Signing The Stimulus More Than (4) Million Jobs Were Lost

Former President Obama, the only President in US history who had his FBI and other Intel agencies spy on the opposition party candidate, claims that he created the great economy that Americans are enjoying today. The only thing Obama created was debt and massive job losses with his horrible economic recovery.

Yesterday the former President tweeted an effort to take credit for President Trump’s successful economy:

Joe Hoft@joehoft

Of course another @BarackObama lie. He can’t open his mouth without lying. 11 years ago the US lost (4.3) million jobs over the next 12 months. Horrible liar. https://twitter.com/barackobama/status/1229432034650722304 

Barack Obama  @BarackObama

Eleven years ago today, near the bottom of the worst recession in generations, I signed the Recovery Act, paving the way for more than a decade of economic growth and the longest streak of job creation in American history.

President Obama’s policies were a disgrace and a failure. He doubled the national debt in spite of zero interest rates from the Fed. His recovery was the worst in US history.

Also, Obama’s assertion is just plain false. The ‘Stimulus’ was passed in February 2009 right after Obama took over the Presidency. He promised to not pass any bills for at least a week to allow for the bills to be read by the people but lied as soon as he was sworn in. The Stimulus was hundreds and hundreds of pages of government handouts to Democrat districts and it was close to $1 million. This was not what America needed and it led to the Tea Party.

Far-left Wikipedia has this to say about the Stimulus:

Note that in his infinite wisdom, NYT economist Paul Krugman is credited with arguing that “the stimulus was far smaller than the economic crisis warranted”. (He also said the markets would crash and burn if President Trump was elected President.)

The data shows that the 12 months after Obama’s stimulus, the US lost 4.3 million jobs:

In Obama’s first three years he netted a loss of 1.5 million jobs compared to President Trump who has added more than 6.7 million jobs.

When it comes to the economy, the billionaire schools the community organizer every time.

Tucker: Bloomberg is trying to buy the election

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