DRAINING THE SWAMP
by Burt Prelutsky
If you want to Comment directly to Burt Prelutsky, please mention my name Rudy. burtprelutsky@icloud.com 

Regrettably, in spite of his best intentions, there is only so much that President Trump can do when it comes to draining the Potomac swamp. Fortunately, a few of the swamp critters have already packed their bags. I specifically have rino-Jeff Flake and Paul Ryan in mind.

I’ll give House Speaker Ryan credit for helping to get the tax reform bill passed, but he is far too easy-going for the job he has. A person in a leadership role has to know how to crack a whip. Break with the President’s agenda and at the very least you’re supposed to lose committee chairmanships and corner offices.

While it’s true that Democrats rarely think for themselves, I guarantee that if any of them gave an inch when it came to tax cuts, Trump’s wall or sanctuary cities and states, they’d be quickly taken out to the woodshed by Chuck clown-Schumer or Nancy Pulosi and introduced to the business end of a hickory stick.

As for rino-Jeff Flake, I suspect the only reason he chose to run as a Republican in the first place was that he looked around and decided that if rino-John McCain was Arizona’s idea of a Republican, that must be what he was, too.

⦿  We are, unfortunately, on the verge of losing a first-rate congressman. It is why I wrote back to the White House after they returned the five-dollar check I wanted President Trump to use as seed money to get his big, beautiful wall built through public subscription.

Because I assumed I was more likely to reach his Special Assistant than I was to reach Donald Trump directly, I wrote: “Dear Ms. Thompson: I appreciate the response from you and the President to my contribution and my suggestion that it be used to kick off the campaign to get the wall built.

“Having failed in that attempt, I am disappointed, but not deflated. I have a second suggestion to make. I believe President Trump would be well-advised to make Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ recusal permanent by replacing him with Trey Gowdy.

“Mr. Gowdy, who has already announced he will be departing from the House at the end of his current term, is simply too intelligent, competent and dedicated to the Constitution, to allow his unique talents to be squandered in the private sector.

“He would be the perfect antidote to Jeff Sessions, who dithers around like an old woman and who opened the door to Robert Mueller’s witch hunt by shirking his responsibilities. Sincerely, Burt Prelutsky”

⦿  Because he was positive that he smelled marijuana after making a traffic stop, a New Jersey state trooper strip-searched the male driver. The search, caught on the officer’s dashcam as well as his body camera, showed Trooper Joseph Drew putting his hands into the man’s underpants, groping the guy’s buttocks and his genitalia for several minutes, while a parade of gawkers drove past on the highway.

As it turned out, no drugs were found in the man’s car or in any of his potential hiding places. The cop wound up citing the poor guy for tailgating, of all things.

A lawsuit is in the works.

In related news, when asked what his current plans are now that his acting career has gone off the tracks thanks to his sexcapades with underage males, Kevin Spacey is rumored to have said he was thinking of spending the next few months tailgating on the New Jersey turnpike.

⦿  One of the constant traits of liberals is their lack of introspection. They never pause to ask themselves or each other whether it’s even possible that those who disagree with them just might be right when it comes to closing the border and ending chain migration.

As for guns, it constantly amazes me that liberals fail to recognize and acknowledge that if the feds disarm decent, law-abiding citizens, it will inevitably increase the chance that they and their friends will be victimized by bad people with guns.

The fact that they – especially those we’re constantly told will be the nation’s future leaders -- march in lockstep, parrot left-wing slogans and never question any statement, no matter how inane, expressed by commie-Bernie Sanders, Chris Matthews, mad-Maxine Waters, Jimmy Kimmel or Elizabeth dinky-Warren, bodes badly for America.

It’s because the boobs never really question any of their pre-digested talking points that they become so angry, tongue-tied and frustrated, when they’re challenged by their intellectual superiors. All they can do is lash out and call their opponents racists, fascists, sexists, bullies, Nazis, homophobes and Islamophobes.

I believe it was Ronald Reagan who first observed how little liberals actually know, and how much that they think they know is wrong.
If you want to Comment directly to Burt Prelutsky, please mention my name Rudy. burtprelutsky@icloud.com 

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Trump has more authority in issues as stated here. If you look back to the mess Obama created in Office, then it makes you doubt Trump of the whys?

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LIGHTER SIDE

 

Political Cartoons by AF Branco

Political Cartoons by Tom Stiglich

ALERT ALERT

 Will  Tea Party Hand The Liberals Their Ass On Election Day? 

It was this week two years ago that Hillary Clinton’s victory looked assured, when the infamous “Access Hollywood” tape of Donald Trump bragging about sexual assault appeared all but certain to end his campaign.

Jesse Ferguson remembers it well. The deputy press secretary for Clinton’s campaign also remembers what happened a month later.

It’s why this veteran Democratic operative can’t shake the feeling that, as promising as the next election looks for his party, it might still all turn out wrong.

“Election Day will either prove to me I have PTSD or show I’ve been living déjà vu,” Ferguson said. “I just don’t know which yet.”

Ferguson is one of many Democrats who felt the string of unexpected defeat in 2016 and are now closely — and nervously — watching the current election near its end, wondering if history will repeat itself. This year, instead of trying to win the presidency, Democrats have placed an onus on trying to gain 23 House seats and win a majority.

The anxiety isn’t universal, with many party leaders professing confidently and repeatedly that this year really is different.

But even some of them acknowledge the similarities between the current and previous election: Trump is unpopular and beset by scandal, Democrats hold leads in the polls, and some Republicans are openly pessimistic.

FiveThirtyEight gives Democrats a 76.9 percent chance of winning the House one month before Election Day. Their odds for Clinton’s victory two years ago? 71.4 percent.

The abundance of optimism brings back queasy memories for Jesse Lehrich, who worked on the Clinton campaign and remembers watching the returns come in from the Javits Center in New York.

“I was getting texts after the result was clear – including even from some political reporters and operatives – texting me, you know, ‘Are you guys starting to get nervous?’ or ‘What’s her most likely path?’” he said. “I was like, ‘What do you mean, starting to get nervous? What path? They just called Wisconsin. We lost.’”

“People were so slow to process that reality because they just hadn’t considered the possibility that Donald Trump was going to be the next president,” he continued.

Lehrich said he sees similarities between 2016 and 2018. But he said he thought Democrats were cognizant of the parallels and determined not to let up a month before the election, as many voters might have two years ago.

Other Democratic leaders aren’t so sure. Asked if he thought his party was overconfident, Democratic Rep. Seth Moulton responded flatly, “Yes.”

Democrats could win a lot of House seats, he said, or could still fall short of capturing a majority.

“The point is that we’ve got to realize that this not just some unstoppable blue wave but rather a lot of tough races that will be hard-fought victories,” Moulton said.

If Democrats are universally nervous about anything after 2016, it’s polling. The polls weren’t actually as favorable to Clinton and the Democrats as some remember, something 538’s Nate Silver and some other journalists pointed out at the time.

But Clinton’s decision not to campaign in a state she’d lose, Wisconsin, and the failure of pollsters everywhere to miss a wave of Trump supporters in red areas are mistakes Democrats are still grappling with today.

“Clearly last cycle, polling was off,” Ben Ray Lujan, chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, told reporters last month. “There were a lot of predictions that were made last cycle that didn’t come to fruition.”

Lujan emphasized in particular how pollsters missed the rural vote, calling it a “devastating mistake.” He said the DCCC has taken deliberate steps since 2016 to get it right this time around, but underscored a congressional majority still required a tooth-and-nail fight.

“So I’m confident with the team that’s been assembled, but I’m definitely cognizant of the fact we need to understand these models and understand the data for what it is,” he said.

One Democratic pollster said the data he’s seen makes plain that the party is favored to win a majority — but that it’s still not a sure thing. He said even now it’s unclear if the political environment will create an electoral tsunami, or merely a good year where Democrats might still fall short of a House majority.

“We’ve all learned a lesson from 2016 that there are multiple possibilities and outcomes,” said the pollster, granted anonymity to discuss polling data one month before the election. “And if you haven’t learned that lesson, shame on you. That 20 percent outcome can happen. That 30 percent outcome can happen.”

This year, Democrats have history on their side: The incumbent president’s party historically struggles during midterm elections. That wasn’t the case in 2016, when Democrats were trying to win the presidency for three consecutive terms for the first time in their history since Franklin Delano Roosevelt (The GOP accomplished the feat only once in the same period, with Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush.)

Some Democratic leaders say the reality of Trump’s presidency — unlike its hypothetical state in 2016 — changes the dynamic entirely.

“Democratic energy is at nuclear levels,” said Steve Israel, a former DCCC chairman. “Democrats would crawl over broken glass to vote in this election.”

Israel said he still has concerns about November (political operatives always have concerns about the upcoming election). But he waves away the notion that the party might fall short of a House majority.

“Most Democrats and a heck of a lot of Republicans I speak to believe that Democrats will have the majority,” he said. “The real question is, by how much?”

Ferguson is, of course, of two minds: He thinks the push to repeal the Affordable Care Act and the day-to-day reality of Trump’s presidency fundamentally changes how voters will see this election.

But he’s also gun-shy about what could change in the next month, after the multitude of surprises that occurred during the last month of the 2016 race, whether the “Access Hollywood” recording or then-FBI Director James Comey’s announcement that the investigation into Clinton’s emails was re-opened.

Many Republicans argue the 2018 election has already seen its October surprise, with the confirmation fight over Brett Kavanaugh finally motivating conservative voters to vote.

“I don’t know what the October surprises will be,” Ferguson said. “But we make a mistake if we assume that what we’re seeing today is what we’ll see for the entire month. We lived through it two years ago.”

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