Bank of America CEO: ‘We Want a Cashless Society’


Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan embraced the digital cashless movement on Wednesday, saying his firm has “more to gain than anybody” from eliminating cash from society.

We want a cashless society,” Moynihan, who heads up the second largest U.S. bank, told attendees at Fortune’s Brainstorm Finance conference.

 He pointed out that more than half of all money transactions are already processed electronically, with the rise of cryptocurrencies, and payment systems like PayPal, Zelle, and digital wallets.

 The global elite and banking lobby want a digital cashless system because this will give them even more control over us. Global bankers want to monitor and control every single transaction, while destroying real world currencies so they can issue money that doesn’t exist, creating impossible financial burdens for the masses, all the while accumulating extraordinary real wealth and power for themselves.

 Populations relying on a fully digital cashless grid will be incredibly vulnerable in times of crisis. A terrorist or military attack, or even a storm or power outage, would mean the end of a functional economy. Payments would stop, the economy would grind to a halt, and life as we know it would end.

 A new, desperate climate would take hold, with entire populations left vulnerable and helpless, completely under the control of their government and the shadowy elites pulling the strings.

 Why would Western governments ban cash when there are such disastrous consequences for humanity waiting just around the corner?

 Because the shadowy elites and their banking cartels want us to be easily manipulated, cowed and controlled.

 Businesses, and even entire countries like Sweden, have already jumped on the movement to end the era of cash, disrupting the hard currency that has underpinned modern economies.

 Yahoo report: Non-cash transactions are forecast to grow by a compounded annualized growth rate of 12.7% through 2021, according to a 2018 study produced by BNP Paribas and Capgemini. Those vast volumes put financial intermediaries in a prime position to benefit from processing those transactions.

 The banking sector has “already digitized,” Moynihan said on Wednesday. “The business has moved digitally and it will continue to move that way. It’s just figuring out how to add the value.”

https://newspunch.com/bank-america-ceo-cashless-society/

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 Everyone is out to lunch on this one.

No, not all.

He looks like Herman Muster.

 Herman Muster, cute comparison. But they are still walking a dangerous line to control people.

 Dump all of the global banks, deal with small town banks only.

Lets make some copies for our news paper edition of best comments...:)-

I love a good internet story...:)-

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SICK: Leprosy On The Rise In Los Angeles 

Ahh, the joys of open borders and Democrat leadership.

California is not just a public toilet but now there is evidence that leprosy is on the rise in Los Angeles County.

Barack Obama changed US law in 2016 and allowed immigrants with blistering STDs and leprosy to migrate to the US.

Medscape reported:

Leprosy, also known as Hansen’s disease, is rarely seen in the United States, but cases continue to emerge in Los Angeles County, a new report says.

“Hansen’s disease still exists, and we need to educate medical students and physicians,” coauthor Dr. Maria Teresa Ochoa from Keck Medical Center of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, told Reuters Health by email.

Dr. Ochoa and colleagues identified 187 patients with the disease in a review of medical records from their leprosy clinic spanning 1973 to 2018. Most patients were Latino, originating from Mexico, and they experienced a median delay in diagnosis of more than three years, the team reports JAMA Dermatology, online August 7.

Multibacillary leprosy (MB) cases outnumbered paucibacillary leprosy (PB) cases by nearly eight to one (88.6% vs. 11.4%, respectively), and Latino patients were more likely than non-Latino patients to have MB, as were patients from Central or South America (versus other regions).

Most patients (80.7%) received multidrug therapy, and most (92.6%) received antibiotics for more than two years, especially if they had MB.

Only about half of patients (56.7%) had World Health Organization (WHO) grade 0 disability (no signs or symptoms suggestive of leprosy or disability) at the one-year follow-up, whereas 16.0% had grade 1 disability (loss of protective sensation) and 26.2% had grade 2 disability (visible deformity) at the last follow-up.

Among the patients who lost protective sensation, 87.7% (50/57) did not regain it following therapy.

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