ANTI-TRUMP 'RESISTANCE' LEADER FACES CHILD-RAPE ACCUSATION

2 others made similar claims against 'gay' mayor of Seattle

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray

Only three days before a 46-year-old man filed a lawsuit accusing him of child rape and “molestation,” Seattle Mayor Ed Murray was featured in a national interview story as one of the faces of the Democratic Party’s resistance to President Trump.

The Politico story April 3 said Murray was “positioning himself at the forefront of the pushback” to Trump.

His city had sued the federal government to stop the crackdown on “sanctuary cit... and he had teamed with Washington’s governor and attorney general to oppose Trump’s temporary travel ban, resulting in a ruling by a federal judge in Seattle to temporarily halt the president’s executive order.

Murray, who is running for re-election this year, told Politico he was “beginning to think we’re dealing with America’s first authoritarian administration.”

But last Thursday, a local man filed a lawsuit against the 61-year-old mayor, claiming Murray raped and molested him when the man was a teenager.

The Seattle Times broke the story with a thorough, multi-reporter examination of the charges, including interviews with two other men with similar profiles who told similar stories and provided matching intimate physical details of Murray and the apartment he lived in at the time.

In a brief appearance before reporters at City Hall Friday, Murray,... and he said he felt sad for the “troubled” individual making the claims.

“I have never backed down,” he said. “And I will not back down now.”

“Let me be clear: These allegations, dating back to a period of more than 30 years, are simply not true,” the mayor said.

The mayor’s personal spokesman Jeff Reading said: “These false accusations are intended to damage a prominent elected official who has been a defender of vulnerable populations for decades. It is not a coincidence that this shakedown effort comes within weeks of the campaign filing deadline. These unsubstantiated assertions, dating back three decades, are categorically false. Mayor Murray has never engaged in an inappropriate relationship with any minor. … Mayor Murray will vigorously fight these allegations in court.”

However, the Times later explained it rationale for deciding to investigate and report the allegations, noting it had interviewed two other accusers and sought “documentation or witnesses to corroborate their accounts.”

The Times knew of two other accusers in March 2008, Jeff Simpson and Lloyd Anderson, but chose not to report their claims at the time, because, among other things, the attorney for Simpson withdrew a potential lawsuit.

“Ultimately, we felt we did not have enough information to publish these very serious accusations,” the Times said.

But the paper “decided we needed to take another look when we learned recently that a Kent man was preparing to sue now-Mayor Murray.”

“We found no connection between the new accuser, identified in the lawsuit as D.H., and the other men. Our reporting revealed similarities among the three accounts, including some graphic details. We felt readers should know,” the Times said.

“We don’t take these decisions lightly, and make them only after lengthy discussions. We know this is a disturbing story. But we cannot shy away from important stories simply because they make us uncomfortable.”

After Murray’s statement Friday, the lawyer for D.H., Lincoln Beauregard, asserted in a statement that Murray was lying, arguing the mayor’s representatives have never asked for his client’s identity, so if Murray is being truthful “he should have no idea who my client is” and would have no basis to “paint him as ‘troubled,'” unless he knew him.

Seattle

Seattle

Epicenter of resistance

Murray was named in a Feb. 5 Washington Post article headlined “How Washington state became the epicenter of resistance to Trump’s...” noting the mayor had vowed to protect illegal-alien residents, even asking the city to rework budgets in anticipation of the loss of federal funds.

“This city will not be bullied by this administration,” Murray told the Associated Press.

Politico reported Murray’s path to City Hall in Seattle began as an AIDS activist in the 1980s. Later, he managed a friend’s campaign for state representative. Murray was appointed to that seat himself after the friend died. He then won a seat in the state Senate before defeating an incumbent in a 2013 mayoral primary.

Under Murray, Seattle led the nation in imposing a $15 minimum wage and has initiated controversial, tax-hiking programs to combat homelessness that have included tent cities and encampments deploying run-down RVs.

Days before the lawsuit against him was filed, Murray scrapped a multimillion-dollar proposed city property tax hi... in favor of pursuing a county sales tax increase to pay for services in the region.

Seattle and King County rank third — behind Los Angeles and New York City — among 50 major cities and counties in the number of homeless people, with nearly 11,000, according to a November 2016 federal government report.

In his interview with Politico April 3, Murray discussed his Catholic faith — he once studied to be a priest before changing direction — and the divisions among Democrats who are trying to mount a resistance to Trump.

“On the national level, at times, I feel like we are becoming like the tea party on the far right, that we have purity tests,” he said.

“If we are starting to have purity tests amongst ourselves, then we’re never going to gain back those working-class and lower-income people that we are building a progressive movement for.”

‘Healing process’

The three accusers interviewed by the Times said they knew Murray when they were growing up in Portland in the 1980s.

In his legal complaint, D.H. alleges Murray “raped and molested him” over several years, beginning in 1986 when the man was a 15-year-old high-school dropout and crack-cocaine addict.

“I have been dealing with this for over 30 years,” the man, now sober for a year, told the Times.

He said he was coming forward as part of a “healing process” after years of “the shame, the embarrassment, the guilt, the humiliation that I put myself through and that he put me through.”

Jeff Simpson in 1984 yearbook photo (Seattle Times)

The two other accusers, Simpson and Anderson, also described themselves as troubled teens in the 1980s when they knew Murray.

Simpson told the Times he spoke to a detective and a social worker in 1984 about his claim, but no charges were filed.

A decade ago, they both raised the allegations to media and Washington state lawmakers. Simpson, in 2008, said he spoke on the phone with the Rev. Ken Hutcherson, the late local pastor who was an outspoken activist for traditional marriage.

Anderson and Simpson told the Times they would testify in court if needed.

Murray’s spokesman, Reading, addressed the previous claims.

“The two older accusations were promoted by extreme right-wing anti-gay activists in the midst of the marriage equality campaign, and were thoroughly investigated and dismissed by both law enforcement authorities and the media,” he said.

The Times pointed out all three of Murray’s accusers have “substantial criminal records.”

Simpson said he understands why people didn’t believe him then.

“I get it. I understand, my past is less than stellar,” he said. “… People did think I was nuts and nobody wanted to believe it. But I felt I needed to tell the truth, finally tell the truth.”

D.H. told the Times he didn’t see how Murray could deny the claims. The paper said attorneys want to question the mayor under oath within 90 days.

The accuser wants Murray held accountable for treating him “like I was just nothing, like I was worthless.”

His lawsuit said he “is disturbed that Mr. Murray maintains a position of trust and authority, and believes that the public has a right to full information when a trusted official exploits a child.”

‘Potential land mines’

The Seattle Time’s Nina Shapiro cited the director of transgender advocacy group’s reaction to the allega...

Danni Askini of the Gender Justice League said it’s “too soon” to take sides but said she felt emotional about the allegations.

“The news has been unbelievably triggering for survivors of DV (domestic violence), sexual assault and childhood sexual assault,” she wrote in a Facebook post.

But she is also concerned, Shapiro said, about how “accusations like these can feed homophobic stereotypes.”

“I see so many potential land mines here,” Askini wrote.

Shapiro said that while the mayor and his spokesmen have accused the men of having political motivations, “the allegations — though unproven and still fresh — had an all-too-familiar ring.”

“It’s the pattern,” said Richard Sipe, a former priest who has written and testified about sexual abuse in the Catholic church. “All the elements are there.”

Sipe noted the alleged victims were vulnerable people, and Murray is accused of developing a relationship with them by offering help.

In Catholic church abuse cases he has studied, Sipe told the Times, priests often chose children who had lost a father, then drew close and said, “I’ll be your father now.”

Mary Dispenza, Northwest leader of Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests, didn’t want to jump to conclusions, recalling Murray was a leader in supporting homosexuals in the church.

But she told Shapiro the allegations stirred memories.

Dispenza said he was abused at age 7 but didn’t disclose it until she was 52.

“I know what holds us back,” she said, referring to shame.

On Monday, the Times reported members of the Seattle City Council were remaining silent about the allegations. Council President Bruce Harrell said in a written statement he and the council’s other members “have no intention of commenting on matters of pending or potential litigation. We believe that it is critically important that, together, we remain committed to the business of governing.”

If Murray were to resign, Harrell would be called upon to serve as acting mayor.

“Our city cannot afford to be distracted,” Harrell said. “There is a judicial process that will address the serious allegations that this situation has presented, and we will respect that process and the rights of all parties involved. All accusations of abuse require a thorough investigation. It is in our human nature to immediately want answers, but I ask we not cast aspersions to the parties involved before we have all the facts through the legal process. I am confident that through this process, truth and justice will prevail.”


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LIGHTER SIDE

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ALERT ALERT

Newt Says What The Rest Of Us Are Thinking:
It’s Time To Throw Peter Strzok In Jail

Disgraced FBI special agent Peter Strzok, a senior member of the bureau who gained notoriety in recent months over his anti-Trump text messages to a colleague, was grilled for nearly 10 hours during a joint congressional committee hearing on Thursday.

At issue was Strzok’s anti-Trump texts to former FBI lawyer and lover Lisa Page that coincided with his leading of the investigations into both former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s private email server scandal and the alleged Trump/Russia 2016 election collusion, as well as his involvement in the subsequent Robert Mueller special counsel probe.

The hearing proved to be a heated battle, as Strzok displayed an arrogant smugness in defiance of pointed questions from Republicans that he largely danced around, while Democrats sought to upend and undermine the entire hearing with a plethora of interruptions, parliamentary maneuvers and outright praise for the man who helped let Clinton off the hook while ferociously targeting Trump.

Former House speaker and presidential candidate Newt Gingrich was less than impressed with Strzok’s performance and cooperation in the hearing and suggested during an appearance on Fox Business that the FBI agent should be held in contempt of Congress.

“I think they have to move to hold him in contempt and throw him in jail,” Gingrich said of Congress and Strzok.

“This is a person who is willfully standing up and refusing to appear as a congressional witness and he was a government employee at the time,” he continued.

“He has every obligation to inform the legislative branch, and I don’t think they have any choice except to move a motion of contempt because he is fundamentally — and so is his girlfriend (Page) — they’re both fundamentally in violation of the entire constitutional process,” he added.

Page had been subpoenaed to appear before Congress on Wednesday but refused to appear, saying she’d been unable to review relevant documents prior to the scheduled hearing, a closed-door hearing that has since been rescheduled for Friday.

Gingrich was not the only one who thought Strzok deserved to be held in contempt of Congress, as House Judiciary Committee chairman Bob Goodlatte informed Strzok that he remained at risk of such during the hearing, according to The Daily Caller.

That warning from Goodlatte came after Strzok had refused to answer a straightforward question posed by House Oversight Committee chairman Trey Gowdy, regarding how many people Strzok had personally interviewed between a specific set of dates in relation to the Clinton email investigation.

“Mr. Strzok, please be advised that you can either comply with the committee’s direction to answer the question or refuse to do so,” Goodlatte stated. “The latter of which will place you in risk of a contempt citation and potential criminal liability. Do you understand that? The question is directed to the witness.”

Strzok still refused to answer, citing instructions received from his counsel and the FBI to not answer certain questions on certain topics.

Goodlatte replied, “Mr. Strzok, in a moment we will continue with the hearing, but based on your refusal to answer the question, at the conclusion of the day we will be recessing the hearing and you will be subject to recall to allow the committee to consider proceeding with a contempt citation.”

It is unclear if Goodlatte and the committee ultimately did consider a contempt citation for Strzok following the contentious hearing, nor is it clear if Page will be held in contempt for blowing off her subpoenaed appearance on Wednesday.

Hopefully Congress will follow through on the threats of contempt followed by actual jail time against Strzok and Page in response to their uncooperative behavior and failure to appear when subpoenaed, if only to ensure that future witnesses called before Congress for sensitive or contentious hearings don’t think they can get away with the same sort of behavior.

TEA PARTY TARGET

Cops Sent To Seize Veteran’s Guns Without A Warrant, He Refused To Turn Them Over

“No one from the state was going to take my firearms without due process,” says Leonard Cottrell, after successfully staving off law enforcement and the courts from confiscating his firearms. Cottrell, an Iraq War veteran, was at work when he received a phone call from his wife. The cops were there, busting in to take his guns away. It all started after a casual conversation his son had at school.

Ammoland reports:

Police said their visit was sparked by a conversation that Leonard Cottrell Jr.’s 13-year-old son had had with another student at the school. Cottrell said he was told his son and the other student were discussing security being lax and what they would have to do to escape a school shooting at Millstone Middle School.

The conversation was overheard by another student, who went home and told his parents, and his mother panicked. The mom then contacted the school, which contacted the State Police, according to Cottrell.

The visit from the troopers came around 10 p.m. on June 14, 2018, Cottrell said, a day after Gov. Phil Murphy signed several gun enforcement bills into law.

After several hours, Cottrell said police agreed not to take the guns but to allow him to move them to another location while the investigation continued.

“They had admitted several times that my son made no threat to himself or other students or the school or anything like that,” he said.

Cottrell said he made it very clear to the police that he was “not going to willingly give up my constitutional rights where there’s no justifiable cause, no warrants, no nothing.”

The troopers searched his son’s room and found nothing, Cottrell said.

“To appease everybody, I had my firearms stored someplace else,” he said. “That way, during the course of the investigation, my son doesn’t have access to them and it’s on neutral ground and everything and everybody’s happy.”

“In the Garden State, the usual approach is to confiscate first and ask questions later, and victims of this approach often don’t know their rights. ‎In this case, the victim pushed back and confiscation was avoided — but the circumstances surrounding the incident are outrageous. A student expressing concern over lack of security is not a reason to send police to the student’s home — but it might be a reason to send police to the school to keep students and teachers safe” said Scott L. Bach, executive director of the Association of New Jersey Rifle & Pistol Clubs and a member of the NRA board of directors.

NJ.com adds:

Cottrell, a disabled U.S. Army veteran who served three tours during “Operation Iraqi Freedom,” owns a shotgun and a pistol. He has all the correct permits to own the firearms, he said, and predominately uses the shotgun to hunt.

He said his wife allowed the officers to enter the home, and with her permission, they searched his son’s room — but they did not find any weapons, he said. The officers, he said, didn’t have a warrant but still wanted to take his guns. Cottrell wouldn’t let them.

“No one from the state was going to take my firearms without due process,” he said Thursday.

He said the attempted seizure resulted because of a new law Gov. Phil Murphy signed into law that makes it easier for police to confiscate guns when someone in the state poses a threat to themselves or others. The law is part of a broader statewide effort to make New Jersey’s gun laws even tougher amid the national outcry for more gun control in the wake of the school shooting in Parkland, Florida.

Cottrell said the officers “danced around the issue” when he confronted them about the new law.

A New Jersey State Police spokesman declined to answer questions about whether this incident had anything to do with the new gun laws.

In an email, Sgt. First Class Jeff Flynn said, “Troopers responded to Mr. Cottrell’s residence in reference to the report of a possible school threat. Based on their investigation, it was determined that Mr. Cottrell’s weapons did not need to be seized.”

David Codrea, writing for Ammoland, further added:

To appease everybody, I had my firearms stored someplace else,” New Jersey gun owner and Army veteran Leonard Cottrell Jr. told New Jersey 101.5 after a June 14 visit from State Police,. “That way, during the course of the investigation, my son doesn’t have access to them and it’s on neutral ground and everything and everybody’s happy.”

Cottrell was recalling state troopers showing up at his door to confiscate firearms after his 13-year-old son was overheard discussing lax school safety with a friend.

Indoctrinated by a pervasive snitch culture — one that never seems to deter the blatantly obvious demonic nutjobs — the eavesdropping student told his parents, who told school administrators, who in turn called the cops. (Note “If you see something, say something” carries risks of its own – if you report the wrong person, you could end up smeared as a “hater.”)

“Cottrell said he made it very clear to the police that he was ‘not going to willingly give up my constitutional rights where there’s no justifiable cause, no warrants, no nothing,’” the report continued. Despite that, his home is now a “gun free zone” and that has been publicized by the media. He has, in fact, willingly ceded those rights, and by his own words in order to make authorities “happy.”

Before judging him for that, consider the environment that is New Jersey. Then consider the overwhelming force the state can bring to bear, and its predisposition to using it, especially if it’s to enforce citizen disarmament. It’s easy to anonymously declare “Molon Labe” on the internet. In meatspace, resistance is more effective when the aggressor doesn’t get to dictate the time and place, especially if that place is your home and you have family inside.

Appeasing gun-grabbers, generally couched as “compromise,” is impossible. It’s like throwing a scrap of flesh to a circling pack of jackals and expecting them to be sated and leave you alone — instead of sensing opportunity and fear, and moving in closer.

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