Anonymous donor behind campaign to install Nativity scenes nationwide

NativitySet

An anonymous donor has joined with the activist group American Nativity Scene and the Thomas More Society in a campaign to provide free Nativity scenes to display at or near statehouses across the nation.

The organizers say now is the time to prepare for the displays because of the process required to obtain permission.

“Indeed, these are for Christmastime display, but October is the time of year to start finalizing plans for a privately funded Christmas display as is legally allowed in traditional public forums such as state capitols, county complexes or city hall lawns,” explained Ed O’Malley, president of American Nativity Scene.

“We are giving away free Nativity scenes. It’s not really a Halloween treat, but it’s definitely not a trick. We are seriously committed to our goal of keeping Christ in Christmas.”

Tom Brejcha, the Thomas More Society president, said atheist groups “may mock our message, but we will not be silent as it is critical that Christians proclaim the Gospel message to their fellow citizens.”

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“Anti-Christian, anti-Christmas rhetoric and satanic expositions merely serve to provide sharp emphasis by means of their stark contrast with the positive, uplifting, hopeful and joyous message of Christmas,” Brejcha said. “The Christmas message bears secular as well as religious significance, as it highlights the hope and miracle of birth and new life, the inherent dignity of each and every human being, focusing our attention on the humble and lowly infant wrapped in swaddling clothes and laid in a manger amidst straw and animals, honored by shepherds and kings alike, and heralded by choirs of angels. That message of the essential equality of all human beings, no matter how rich or poor, humble or high-stationed, resonates deeply with the values that Americans cherish.”

The mission of American Nativity Scene is to place a Nativity scene within or directly outside state capitol buildings across America. Last Christmas, it provided 14 displays.

The attorneys at the Thomas More Society have defended citizens who privately fund religious displays on public property, arguing they are protected by the First and 14th Amendments of the U. S. Constitution.

The organizers explain a permanent federal injunction banning discrimination against religious speech assures that the Christmas creches are protected from erroneous applications of the widely misunderstood concept of “separation of church and state.”

American Nativity Scene says it already has shipped more than 300 scenes to 32 different states to be erected in public parks, libraries, farm roads and government buildings.

“All it takes is for a few people willing to stand up and be heard on this critical issue of freedom of religious speech,” the group said.

A poll showed 72 percent of Americans agree that religious scenes should be allowed in public.

“Nowhere in the United States Constitution will you find the words/concepts Separation of Church and State. Quite the contrary – the Supreme Court has consistently ruled the oft used ‘Establishment Clause’ that forbids the establishment of one state religion for all, does not require a state entity to exclude private religious speech from public forums,” the Thomas More Society said.

The legal group continued:

Continued here

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Thank you for this share, its all ways nice to see people stand up for their faith.

This is wonderful!!   For so long, the Atheists of the Left, have been determined to ruin our Holiday and it's significance.    Thank God we have a Christian in the White House!!   Let's everyone of us have some sort of Religious display.  I will, already have it planned.  Celebrate, Christianity is on the rise!!    In the Neighborhood I live in Texas, we had so many Nativity scenes in the yards, teenage Kids began picking up Baby Jesus from one ,and putting it in one down the street, and then people would find a strange Jesus in their crib.  With a Neighborhood Bulletin Board, Members began sharing, and all were calling, trying to find their Baby Jesus, and get someone else's back to them. First thought of as theft, then became apparent as a prank,   Good to have that many Baby Jesus anywhere!!

Agree Jo! :-)

Supreme Court Cases have ruled in favor of allow nativity scenes on public grounds if other religious or secular displays have similar access.  However, we can expect challenges in spite of several cases already permitting such displays... the left doesn't give up and is not averse to filing frivolous law suits... as long as they can get some judge to issue a temporary restraining order/injunction in conjunction with their lawsuit they feel vindicated.

Now Ronald,

You know thats not a honest statement, first off it may have been Democrats that built this, and second, the Supreme Court should of never became involved, according to the Constitution.

The US Supreme Court has ruled in favor of permitting religious displays on public lands where the government permits open access to all who would want to participate.

See: http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-court-prayer-20140506-story.html

The Supreme Court has ruled that the " 'Establishment Clause' never bars private citizens from placing religious displays in publicly owned spaces that are generally open to everyone."

See: http://www.pewforum.org/files/2007/06/religious-displays.pdf

The problem is that people are confused because of so many rulings by lower courts and over the years... by the Supreme Court have provided for open disputes based on past rulings that have been overturned.  Basically, the current law of the land allows for religious displays on public property if privately funded and the property is open for all citizen groups to use for displays regardless of their religious affiliation or content.

However, many atheist and agnostics still remain in high office and some are judges and local prosecutors... who attempt to enforce overturned rulings of past courts.  These individuals need to be disciplined ... fired ... for their blatant refusal to enforce the CURRENT law: permitting public displays of a religious nature, when they are privately funded and placed on public property, where ALL citizens or groups have a right to post displays.

Thanks for posting Colonel :-)

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 Will  Tea Party Hand The Liberals Their Ass On Election Day? 

It was this week two years ago that Hillary Clinton’s victory looked assured, when the infamous “Access Hollywood” tape of Donald Trump bragging about sexual assault appeared all but certain to end his campaign.

Jesse Ferguson remembers it well. The deputy press secretary for Clinton’s campaign also remembers what happened a month later.

It’s why this veteran Democratic operative can’t shake the feeling that, as promising as the next election looks for his party, it might still all turn out wrong.

“Election Day will either prove to me I have PTSD or show I’ve been living déjà vu,” Ferguson said. “I just don’t know which yet.”

Ferguson is one of many Democrats who felt the string of unexpected defeat in 2016 and are now closely — and nervously — watching the current election near its end, wondering if history will repeat itself. This year, instead of trying to win the presidency, Democrats have placed an onus on trying to gain 23 House seats and win a majority.

The anxiety isn’t universal, with many party leaders professing confidently and repeatedly that this year really is different.

But even some of them acknowledge the similarities between the current and previous election: Trump is unpopular and beset by scandal, Democrats hold leads in the polls, and some Republicans are openly pessimistic.

FiveThirtyEight gives Democrats a 76.9 percent chance of winning the House one month before Election Day. Their odds for Clinton’s victory two years ago? 71.4 percent.

The abundance of optimism brings back queasy memories for Jesse Lehrich, who worked on the Clinton campaign and remembers watching the returns come in from the Javits Center in New York.

“I was getting texts after the result was clear – including even from some political reporters and operatives – texting me, you know, ‘Are you guys starting to get nervous?’ or ‘What’s her most likely path?’” he said. “I was like, ‘What do you mean, starting to get nervous? What path? They just called Wisconsin. We lost.’”

“People were so slow to process that reality because they just hadn’t considered the possibility that Donald Trump was going to be the next president,” he continued.

Lehrich said he sees similarities between 2016 and 2018. But he said he thought Democrats were cognizant of the parallels and determined not to let up a month before the election, as many voters might have two years ago.

Other Democratic leaders aren’t so sure. Asked if he thought his party was overconfident, Democratic Rep. Seth Moulton responded flatly, “Yes.”

Democrats could win a lot of House seats, he said, or could still fall short of capturing a majority.

“The point is that we’ve got to realize that this not just some unstoppable blue wave but rather a lot of tough races that will be hard-fought victories,” Moulton said.

If Democrats are universally nervous about anything after 2016, it’s polling. The polls weren’t actually as favorable to Clinton and the Democrats as some remember, something 538’s Nate Silver and some other journalists pointed out at the time.

But Clinton’s decision not to campaign in a state she’d lose, Wisconsin, and the failure of pollsters everywhere to miss a wave of Trump supporters in red areas are mistakes Democrats are still grappling with today.

“Clearly last cycle, polling was off,” Ben Ray Lujan, chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, told reporters last month. “There were a lot of predictions that were made last cycle that didn’t come to fruition.”

Lujan emphasized in particular how pollsters missed the rural vote, calling it a “devastating mistake.” He said the DCCC has taken deliberate steps since 2016 to get it right this time around, but underscored a congressional majority still required a tooth-and-nail fight.

“So I’m confident with the team that’s been assembled, but I’m definitely cognizant of the fact we need to understand these models and understand the data for what it is,” he said.

One Democratic pollster said the data he’s seen makes plain that the party is favored to win a majority — but that it’s still not a sure thing. He said even now it’s unclear if the political environment will create an electoral tsunami, or merely a good year where Democrats might still fall short of a House majority.

“We’ve all learned a lesson from 2016 that there are multiple possibilities and outcomes,” said the pollster, granted anonymity to discuss polling data one month before the election. “And if you haven’t learned that lesson, shame on you. That 20 percent outcome can happen. That 30 percent outcome can happen.”

This year, Democrats have history on their side: The incumbent president’s party historically struggles during midterm elections. That wasn’t the case in 2016, when Democrats were trying to win the presidency for three consecutive terms for the first time in their history since Franklin Delano Roosevelt (The GOP accomplished the feat only once in the same period, with Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush.)

Some Democratic leaders say the reality of Trump’s presidency — unlike its hypothetical state in 2016 — changes the dynamic entirely.

“Democratic energy is at nuclear levels,” said Steve Israel, a former DCCC chairman. “Democrats would crawl over broken glass to vote in this election.”

Israel said he still has concerns about November (political operatives always have concerns about the upcoming election). But he waves away the notion that the party might fall short of a House majority.

“Most Democrats and a heck of a lot of Republicans I speak to believe that Democrats will have the majority,” he said. “The real question is, by how much?”

Ferguson is, of course, of two minds: He thinks the push to repeal the Affordable Care Act and the day-to-day reality of Trump’s presidency fundamentally changes how voters will see this election.

But he’s also gun-shy about what could change in the next month, after the multitude of surprises that occurred during the last month of the 2016 race, whether the “Access Hollywood” recording or then-FBI Director James Comey’s announcement that the investigation into Clinton’s emails was re-opened.

Many Republicans argue the 2018 election has already seen its October surprise, with the confirmation fight over Brett Kavanaugh finally motivating conservative voters to vote.

“I don’t know what the October surprises will be,” Ferguson said. “But we make a mistake if we assume that what we’re seeing today is what we’ll see for the entire month. We lived through it two years ago.”

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